ACEsConnection Community Invited by CDC to Nominate Heroes Using ACEs Science to Prevent Violence.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) is working to increase awareness, understanding, and commitment to violence prevention in a new “Tell Us About Your Hero” video series. The series will highlight people performing extraordinary acts of heroism in an effort to shift the culture and change the context in which violence occurs. Stories may focus on preventing violence types such as suicide, child abuse and neglect, sexual violence, intimate partner violence, elder abuse, bullying, or could be crosscutting about preventing multiple violence types. Look at how the heroes you know are using ACEs science to help prevent violence.

What The CDC Needs By March 31, 2018:

Compelling stories of people who prevent violence from happening where they live, learn, or work. They want impactful personal stories of people working to increase protective factors and reduce risk factors to prevent violence. These stories can include but are not limited to:

  • A community champion who addresses violence and embraces violence prevention efforts.
    • Potential example: Group of students at GSU are working to change social norms on campus to reduce sexual violence by doing X, Y and Z activities. [Promotes social norms that protect against violence]
  • About the person, organization/program, policy or hero, who protected them or prevented the violence from occurring.
    • Potential example: State senator sponsors a bill requiring flexible telework and leave policies for parents with young children. [Strengthens economic supports for parents]
  • Family members of those affected by particular violence types and those who helped them through the challenges.
    • Potential examples: A mother and father who experienced ACEs were preparing to have their first child. Recognizing the need to stop the generational cycle of ACEs, they sought parenting classes early, requested home visitation services, and connected to community resources. (Aligns with CAN: Enhance Parenting Skills to Promote Healthy Child Development & Intervene to Lessen Harms and Prevent Future Risk)
    • A family notices teenage child struggling at school, dealing with bullying, and feeling down. They provide emotional support, reach out to their school about peer norms programs, and contact a counselor to work on parenting and coping skills (Promotes Connectedness; Teaches Coping and Problem-Solving Skills; Creates Protective Environments)

How You Can Help - Submit your entry by March 31, 2018

  1. Write a brief note/storyline explaining why you think the individual or group should be featured. Be sure to include the violence type(s) (i.e., suicide, child abuse or neglect etc.) with the submission, and how the hero or heroes are using ACEs science in this work.
  2. Send the note/storyline and violence type to Cole Youngner, Project Director at Banyan Communications, cyoungner@banyancom.com and copy Carey Sipp at ACEs Connection – csipp@acesconnection.com Please make your submission by March 31, 2018.
  3. Following your submission, a Banyan Communications representative will contact you to gather more information about your idea. If selected, Banyan will then reach out to your nominee for an interview. All potential nominees will be vetted before final approval.

 Please note, all submissions will be reviewed to ensure a broad array of stories showing protective factors in action are represented across the many violence types. However, not all submissions will result in a story.   

 About “Tell Us About Your Hero” Video Series

Violence is preventable. Hearing from people who prevented violence, and those who helped them, can inspire others to take action.

 The “Tell Us About Your Hero” series will provide target audiences visual, first-person accounts of people helping to create healthy relationships and communities. The series will also help audiences understand that preventing violence is possible; assess risk and protective factors for violence; and identify potential partner organizations already working in violence prevention.

The series helps to fill a much-needed gap for first-person storytelling. Traditionally, public health stories have been told in the form of data and treatment approaches. “Tell Us About Your Hero” is a new, compelling way to learn about violence prevention and expand the commitment to violence prevention across the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello Carey!

Good day to you!  I've had a hard time sending the nomination to Mr. Youngner, so please forgive the multiple attempts.  

I've tried both emails:  cyoungner@banyan.com and cyoungner@banyancom.com, and I've received failed delivery notices.  

If you could confirm Mr. Youngner's email address, I'd appreciate it!

My apologies for the extra trouble!  Thank you for SUCH an amazing opportunity to nominate Helga Luest, an amazing leader of violence prevention through her tireless advocacy and leadership!

Thank you!

Sincerely,

Katrina Masterson

Robert Olcott posted:

Christine Cissy White and Lucien Lombardo: Thank You for the feedback.... I have not yet written a 'book' yet, but I have read Heather Ann Thompson's  [recent]  book about Attica: "Blood In the Water:...". I did have to write an undergraduate thesis, ("The Current and Future Potential of Consumer Participation in the [New Hampshire] Health Planning Process") - after my tenure (Americorps/VISTA Volunteer) as a low-income/elderly organizer/advocate during the implementation of the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-641)---but that's probably the closest I've come to writing a "book. I did author "The Prisoner's Employment Assistance Brochure for New York State", although I also credit Inmates at the Attica Print Shop with its re-printing there (An attorney at the OEO [poverty] Legal Services Project where I started working as an Investigator, when I got paroled, gave me 'permission to send it to the Attica Inmate as 'Legal Mail', by-passing 'Censorship') --later the Warden at Comstock prison saw a copy of the Attica reprint, and he requested permission to reprint it there, so I also included him and 'Attica Print Shop Inmates' [on my linked-in profile] as 'Co-authors'. I didn't learn the detailed particulars about 'L.D.' Barkley's death at Attica, other than the Monroe County Coroner's comment that the gunshot wound to his back was surrounded by powder burns (inferring he was shot at close range) .... until the SUNY Buffalo Law School hosted a 40th Anniversary of the Attica Uprising conference, that I learned more pertinent particulars. The "Attica 40" conference has a Facebook Page with links to video presentations by conference presenters, including the New Hampshire historian who read the transcripts of the President Nixon-/-NY Governor Rockefeller telephone calls about Attica. I just started crying real tears [again] ..the 'frozen grief' is thawing. Please excuse me. ...

Robert -- Here is a link to a paper about Attica that I wrote many years ago. It was published in an international interdisciplinary journal! 

http://www.geocities.ws/paideusis/e1n2ll.html

I hope you find it interesting! 

Lucien Lombardo

 

Christine Cissy White and Lucien Lombardo: Thank You for the feedback.... I have not yet written a 'book' yet, but I have read Heather Ann Thompson's  [recent]  book about Attica: "Blood In the Water:...". I did have to write an undergraduate thesis, ("The Current and Future Potential of Consumer Participation in the [New Hampshire] Health Planning Process") - after my tenure (Americorps/VISTA Volunteer) as a low-income/elderly organizer/advocate during the implementation of the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-641)---but that's probably the closest I've come to writing a "book. I did author "The Prisoner's Employment Assistance Brochure for New York State", although I also credit Inmates at the Attica Print Shop with its re-printing there (An attorney at the OEO [poverty] Legal Services Project where I started working as an Investigator, when I got paroled, gave me 'permission to send it to the Attica Inmate as 'Legal Mail', by-passing 'Censorship') --later the Warden at Comstock prison saw a copy of the Attica reprint, and he requested permission to reprint it there, so I also included him and 'Attica Print Shop Inmates' [on my linked-in profile] as 'Co-authors'. I didn't learn the detailed particulars about 'L.D.' Barkley's death at Attica, other than the Monroe County Coroner's comment that the gunshot wound to his back was surrounded by powder burns (inferring he was shot at close range) .... until the SUNY Buffalo Law School hosted a 40th Anniversary of the Attica Uprising conference, that I learned more pertinent particulars. The "Attica 40" conference has a Facebook Page with links to video presentations by conference presenters, including the New Hampshire historian who read the transcripts of the President Nixon-/-NY Governor Rockefeller telephone calls about Attica. I just started crying real tears [again] ..the 'frozen grief' is thawing. Please excuse me. ...

Robert Olcott posted:

It took about 40 years for me to learn the circumstances behind Elliot David "L.D." Barkley's death: He was trying to prevent another inmate from stabbing one of the NY State Troopers involved in retaking the prison at Attica....according to some presenters at the SUNY Buffalo Law School 40th Attica Anniversary Conference. I thought "L.D." practiced the most humanity and dignity-affirming respectful behavior, throughout all the time I knew him.

But James T. Ellis, another former 'Panther', who later worked for the local YMCA, subsequently became Tribunals Director at the American Arbitration Association's (AAA) [Rochester, N.Y. office] National Center for Dispute Settlement, and facilitated the training of a team of multi-ethnic male and female former prisoners, guards, and dispute resolution specialists, for a [nation-wide] Prison Dispute Mediation Team, in the hopes of preventing another Attica-type up-rising. James had asked me to present our progress to two AAA Board members. James later succumbed to pancreatic cancer before we formally activated the prison dispute mediation/resolution team. We didn't know about ACEs then, but they were two people I was privileged to know, 

Robert:

Have you written a book about all the people you have known, all the work you have done, witnessed, know about, research because you know so much about SO MUCH and always want to make me know/learn more and honor the work of others. Cissy

Lucien Lombardo posted:

Thank you for the information about the L.D. Barkley and Attica. I was a teacher at Auburn Prison when Attica occurred. Three of my former students (Kenneth Malloy, Thomas Hicks and Lorenzo McNeil) were transferred to Attica after the riot at Auburn in 1970 and were killed in the retaking of Attica, all under circumstances indicating they were targeted (See Malcolm Bell's book, TURKEY SHOOT). Recognition of humanity and human dignity were certainly struggling to emerge at Attica and they unfortunately lost the struggle! 

Lucien:

It gave me the chills to read your comment. Thank you for sharing the memory of these men, your former students, and the book title  - for wider historical context. Cissy

Thank you for the information about the L.D. Barkley and Attica. I was a teacher at Auburn Prison when Attica occurred. Three of my former students (Kenneth Malloy, Thomas Hicks and Lorenzo McNeil) were transferred to Attica after the riot at Auburn in 1970 and were killed in the retaking of Attica, all under circumstances indicating they were targeted (See Malcolm Bell's book, TURKEY SHOOT). Recognition of humanity and human dignity were certainly struggling to emerge at Attica and they unfortunately lost the struggle! 

It took about 40 years for me to learn the circumstances behind Elliot David "L.D." Barkley's death: He was trying to prevent another inmate from stabbing one of the NY State Troopers involved in retaking the prison at Attica....according to some presenters at the SUNY Buffalo Law School 40th Attica Anniversary Conference. I thought "L.D." practiced the most humanity and dignity-affirming respectful behavior, throughout all the time I knew him.

But James T. Ellis, another former 'Panther', who later worked for the local YMCA, subsequently became Tribunals Director at the American Arbitration Association's (AAA) [Rochester, N.Y. office] National Center for Dispute Settlement, and facilitated the training of a team of multi-ethnic male and female former prisoners, guards, and dispute resolution specialists, for a [nation-wide] Prison Dispute Mediation Team, in the hopes of preventing another Attica-type up-rising. James had asked me to present our progress to two AAA Board members. James later succumbed to pancreatic cancer before we formally activated the prison dispute mediation/resolution team. We didn't know about ACEs then, but they were two people I was privileged to know, 

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