September 2017

Confronting Adverse Childhood Experiences to Improve Rural Kids’ Lifelong Health

According to the 2010 U.S. Census , Montana ranks 5th in the nation for the percentage of population living in a rural area (44.1%), eclipsed only by Mississippi, West Virginia, Vermont, and Maine. And as you may know, Montana is the 4th largest state in the nation! There are so many great things about being such a rural state — the charm of small towns, the beauty of farms and ranches, the wide-open spaces, our majestic mountains, rivers, streams, and creeks; and of course, let’s not forget...

James Baldwin’s Lesson for Teachers in a Time of Turmoil [newyorker.com]

“Let’s begin by saying that we are living through a very dangerous time.” So opens “A Talk to Teachers,” which James Baldwin delivered to a group of educators in October, 1963. (He published it in the Saturday Review the following December.) That year, Medgar Evers, a leading civil-rights figure and N.A.A.C.P. state field director, was murdered in his driveway by a white supremacist in Jackson, Mississippi. That year, four young girls—Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and...

In Connecticut, Saving Lives Comes with an Unexpected Perk: Saving Money [nationswell.com]

Across much of the U.S., a person who’s poor, overweight and a candidate for obesity-related diseases might not visit a doctor until they’ve already contracted diabetes — that is, if they can even find a physician who will accept Medicaid, the federal health insurance program aimed at the neediest Americans. But in Connecticut, they’re doing things differently. There, state employees actually reach out to those at the greatest risk before they’ve exhibited any noticeable symptoms, then work...

‘Ganawenjiige Onigam’: A New Symbol of Resilience in Duluth, Minnesota [rewire.news]

A colorful new mural in downtown Duluth, Minnesota, is a potent declaration of the issues facing Native American women such as violence, sex trafficking, and environmental racism. Primarily, however, the enormous portrait of an Ojibwe woman is a symbol of resilience, according to supporters. Painted on an exterior wall of the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO), and completed in August, the mural depicts an Ojibwe woman dressed in a red jingle dress and wearing a red...

Leaders highlight early education for drug misuse prevention [sfchronicle.com]

More than 100 children in New Hampshire's largest city have witnessed an adult overdose in their home since 2016. Now, a police program that officials hope will be replicated elsewhere is working to prevent kids from meeting the same fate. Political and law enforcement leaders came together Friday to promote early childhood education and intervention to prevent substance misuse. They highlighted Manchester's Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team, which includes a police officer, crisis...

How America's Most Integrated School Segregated Again [citylab.com]

A new book tracks how a Charlotte, North Carolina, high school went from an integration success story to the city’s most isolated and impoverished school. Stories of school resegregation are common these days, but the historian Pamela Grundy didn’t think she would she would end up telling one. In 1998, Grundy decided to write a book about school integration in her city of Charlotte, North Carolina, particularly at historically black West Charlotte High. “It was at a time when political and...

Wisconsin Dept of Health Services - Trauma-Informed Care News & Notes (Sept. 18, 2017)

Thank you, @Scott A Webb, at the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, for putting this together. ACEs, Adversity's Impact Every American has a part to play in suicide prevention Immigrant parents report fewer adverse childhood experiences than US-born parents 300,000 families living in US-Mexico border towns face exposure to toxic stress Brain and Biology Childhood maltreatment may change brain's response to threat Scientific discovery explains why stress hormone can...

Jailhouse Blues (www.thesunmagazine.org)

Interview excerpt from the October issue of Sun Magazine . It's with Henry Robinett and by Aaron Carnes. "My first class at Folsom Prison was in the hanging room. This was where they would hang people a hundred years ago. Being in that room filled me with an eerie sense of history, as if there were ghosts in the granite. The inmates were aware of it, too. Carnes: What happened to change your perspective on the inmates? Robinett: Most of them seemed just like you and me. There were a couple...

Making the Good Stuff Louder: Trauma Dad, Byron Hamel

Byron Hamel, (AKA Trauma Dad ), is a filmmaker , children's rights and men's wellness advocate. He's also a father with "ACEs through the roof," who survived child torture at the hands of a man now on death row for infanticide. Before the Father & ACEs chat started last week (see full chat transcript ), we discussed if and how to give a trigger warning. Hamel's experienced horrific trauma during childhood. He didn't want to traumatize those on the chat but wanted to be honest.

As Its Homeless Student Population Surges, Perkins K-8 Is Learning to Adapt [voiceofsandiego.org]

At one point last school year, homeless students made up a third of the Barrio Logan school’s total enrollment. Fernando Hernandez, the principal at Perkins K-8, makes sure his middle school teachers don’t put too much weight on homework. Hernandez caps the percentage of grades drawn from homework at 15 percent, which he says is lower than many middle schools. Though many schools and parents across the country have argued in recent years that schools should de-emphasize homework, Hernandez...

Lady Gaga's Illness Is Not a Metaphor [theatlantic.com]

A new film details the reason the star postponed her recent tour—and will test cultural attitudes about gender, pain, and pop. “Pain without a cause is pain we can’t trust,” the author Leslie Jamison wrote in 2014. “We assume it’s been chosen or fabricated.” Jamison’s essay “Grand Unified Theory of Female Pain” unpacked the suffering-woman archetype, which encompasses literature’s broken hearts (Anna Karenina, Miss Havisham) and society’s sad girls—the depressed, the anorexic, and in the...

The Hunt for an 'Entrepreneurial Ecosystem' [citylab.com]

Business boosters believe connectivity is the key to spurring new businesses. But can that model work in chronically disinvested communities? Vewiser Dixon leans forward behind his wide wooden desk and waxes on about his neighborhood. Dixon has lived in this corner of Kansas City his whole life; it was once and perhaps remains the beating heart of African-American life here—18th and Vine, made famous by Charlie Parker, Count Basie, and that set. Dixon now owns property along the rough-strewn...

The Unfulfilled Promise of Black Capitalism [theatlantic.com]

In her new book, the law professor Mehrsa Baradaran argues that economic self-sufficiency can only go so far without government backing. For generations, many black activists have looked at America’s financial system and said, thanks, but no thanks. As an alternative, they’ve promoted self-sufficiency—the creation of black wealth through black-owned banking and entrepreneurship, and patronage of black businesses. This idea resurfaces again and again, as it did recently in the #BankBlack...

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