First-Ever Evictions Database Shows: 'We're In the Middle Of A Housing Crisis' (National Public Radio, Fresh Air hosted by Terry Gross 4.12.18)

 

For many poor families in America, eviction is a real and ongoing threat. Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that approximately 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute.

"Eviction isn't just a condition of poverty; it's a cause of poverty," Desmond says. "Eviction is a direct cause of homelessness, but it also is a cause of residential instability, school instability [and] community instability."

Desmond won a Pulitzer Prize in 2017 for his book,Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. His latest project is The Eviction Lab, a team of researchers and students at Princeton University dedicated to amassing the nation's first-ever database of eviction. To date, the Lab had collected 83 million records from 48 states and the District of Columbia.

To read and hear the rest of this NPR story from the April 12, 2018 edition of Fresh Air, with host Terry Gross, click here.

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Carey S. Sipp posted:
Thanks, Lisa!  I repaired the link and pasted it in below the comment, as well. It is also here.  Next time I will check the link after I post!

https://www.acesconnection.com/...h-a-housing-solution

And yes, Terry Gross sounded incredulous and frustrated to not be able to find out what happened to the children mentioned in the story. I cannot imagine driving away from that scene of motherless children in the rain, seeing all their belongings drenched on a sidewalk, knowing the lock has been changed and that they are now locked out of what had been the home they shared with their late mother. This is a nation that needs ACEs Communities. Trauma-informed communities! Somehow I believe that had they been in a trauma-informed school or community, the story could have been different. 

What an incredible solution Marjy Stagmeier made happen! Thanks for writing and sharing this story, Carey. 

And I very much agree with you, "This is a nation that needs ACEs Communities. Trauma-informed communities! Somehow I believe that had they been in a trauma-informed school or community, the story could have been different."

Lisa Frederiksen posted:
Carey S. Sipp posted:

Lisa - This reminds me so much of the work of Barbara Ehrenreich who wrote Bait and Switch and Nickeled and Dimed. In Nickeled and Dimed she worked as a minimum wage worker and tried to live on those wages. That Sociologist Matthew Desmond, too, "lived the work," was an imperative to allow us a glimpse inside of the trauma of evictions. I will be ordering the book, too. 

The story was heartbreaking as he described being with the eviction crew and watching them set out -- in a cold spring rain --  the belongings of a family of children whose mom had died. When he said the oldest was a teenager and the youngest was around eight, and that he didn't know whether or not law enforcement called social services, I wanted to go back in time and make the call myself, and find those kids. AND THE THING IS -- there are thousands of children evicted every day. Desmond said his research shows that many families in cities are paying 50 - 80% of their income to cover housing alone! One illness, car repair, legal hassle, or missed paycheck is all it takes for many families to be on the street. 

 

I read Nickeled and Dimed, too, and had the same thought earlier, today!

And I agree, that eviction story was so heartbreaking -- Terry Gross sounded incredulous, too, hearing there was no certainty on whether law enforcement or social services had been called. 

So many ACEs for these children and the trauma/toxic stress their parent(s)/caregivers experience in trying to manage to stay in housing, let alone be evicted from their housing, is equally horrific. Desmond's evictions data base and book are sure to be catalysts for meaningful change.

BTW - the link to your story about Marjy Stagmeier doesn't go through to the story  

Lisa



Thanks, Lisa!  I repaired the link and pasted it in below the comment, as well. It is also here.  Next time I will check the link after I post!

https://www.acesconnection.com/...h-a-housing-solution



And yes, Terry Gross sounded incredulous and frustrated to not be able to find out what happened to the children mentioned in the story. I cannot imagine driving away from that scene of motherless children in the rain, seeing all their belongings drenched on a sidewalk, knowing the lock has been changed and that they are now locked out of what had been the home they shared with their late mother. This is a nation that needs ACEs Communities. Trauma-informed communities! Somehow I believe that had they been in a trauma-informed school or community, the story could have been different. 

Carey S. Sipp posted:

Lisa - This reminds me so much of the work of Barbara Ehrenreich who wrote Bait and Switch and Nickeled and Dimed. In Nickeled and Dimed she worked as a minimum wage worker and tried to live on those wages. That Sociologist Matthew Desmond, too, "lived the work," was an imperative to allow us a glimpse inside of the trauma of evictions. I will be ordering the book, too. 

The story was heartbreaking as he described being with the eviction crew and watching them set out -- in a cold spring rain --  the belongings of a family of children whose mom had died. When he said the oldest was a teenager and the youngest was around eight, and that he didn't know whether or not law enforcement called social services, I wanted to go back in time and make the call myself, and find those kids. AND THE THING IS -- there are thousands of children evicted every day. Desmond said his research shows that many families in cities are paying 50 - 80% of their income to cover housing alone! One illness, car repair, legal hassle, or missed paycheck is all it takes for many families to be on the street. 

 

I read Nickeled and Dimed, too, and had the same thought earlier, today!

And I agree, that eviction story was so heartbreaking -- Terry Gross sounded incredulous, too, hearing there was no certainty on whether law enforcement or social services had been called. 

So many ACEs for these children and the trauma/toxic stress their parent(s)/caregivers experience in trying to manage to stay in housing, let alone be evicted from their housing, is equally horrific. Desmond's evictions data base and book are sure to be catalysts for meaningful change.

BTW - the link to your story about Marjy Stagmeier doesn't go through to the story  

Lisa

Lisa - This reminds me so much of the work of Barbara Ehrenreich who wrote Bait and Switch and Nickeled and Dimed. In Nickeled and Dimed she worked as a minimum wage worker and tried to live on those wages. That Sociologist Matthew Desmond, too, "lived the work," was an imperative to allow us a glimpse inside of the trauma of evictions. I will be ordering the book, too. 

The story was heartbreaking as he described being with the eviction crew and watching them set out -- in a cold spring rain --  the belongings of a family of children whose mom had died. When he said the oldest was a teenager and the youngest was around eight, and that he didn't know whether or not law enforcement called social services, I wanted to go back in time and make the call myself, and find those kids. AND THE THING IS -- there are thousands of children evicted every day. Desmond said his research shows that many families in cities are paying 50 - 80% of their income to cover housing alone! One illness, car repair, legal hassle, or missed paycheck is all it takes for many families to be on the street. 

Losing a home must be among the most traumatizing experiences a child can have. There has to be a better way. 

One bright spot is a woman in Atlanta, Marjy Stagmeier, about whom Jen Hossler and I wrote last summer. Here is the link to that story about this visionary Atlantan growing a community model for trauma-informed education with a housing solution. 

https://www.acesconnection.com/...h-a-housing-solution



Thanks!

C. 

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