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Power and Opportunity in the States [rwjf.org]

 

States have long been laboratories for innovations that influence the health and well-being of their residents. This role has only expanded with the greater flexibility being given to the states, especially as gridlock in Washington, D.C. inspires more local action. The bevvy of new governors and state legislators who took office early this year also widens the door to creativity.

Medicaid is perhaps the most familiar example of state leadership on health. With costs and decisions shared by state and federal governments, the program allows state policymakers to tailor strategies that meet the unique needs of their residents. Among other examples, efforts are underway in California to expand Medicaid access to undocumented adults, and in Montana to connect unemployed Medicaid beneficiaries to employment training and supports.

In Washington state and elsewhere, Medicaid dollars can now cover supportive housing services, while Michigan is among the states requiring Medicaid managed care organizations to submit detailed plans explaining how they address social determinants of health for their enrollees. All of this experimentation is happening as states struggle to control the growth of their health care spendingβ€”a balancing act of immense proportions.

States are taking action on early childhood health as well. For example, while subsidized child care for low-income families is funded primarily by the federal government through the Child Care and Development Block Grant (which got a record-breaking $5.8 billion boost from Congress in 2018), states have a big say in who qualifies for subsidies and whether to offer additional supports. This can lead to substantial variation across the country. Wyoming and Minnesota, for example, maintain child care copayments of $100/month or less from a family of three earning $30,000/year,Β­ while 14 states offer no subsidy at all for families at that income level, meaning they must pay fully out of pocket for child care. One in four states provide additional assistance, supplementing childcare subsidies with refundable tax credits to help families cover the costs of child and dependent care.

Not all state policies have a positive influence on health. Decisions about who qualifies for public benefits, ways to generate new state revenue, and how to implement and enforce laws related to housing, education, and civil rights can put well-being at risk, particularly for marginalized populations, if they are not carefully considered. States must be vigilant about their choices and pay attention to intended and unintended consequences.

To meet that responsibility, policymakers need access to the best available evidence, lessons from other states, and data and stories that can make the case for new investments and health-promoting policies. When policymaking is fully informed, it can help close persistent gaps in well-being and lead to breakthroughs that spread to other states and even to the nation as a whole.



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