The Future in California Lies in Investing in People, Not More Prisons [JJIE.org]

 

Who are we and what do we stand for in criminal and juvenile justice reform? Against the backdrop of a contentious election season and robust conversations about justice reforms that have included proposals to build private prisons, theChildren’s Defense Fund-California (CDF-CA) is taking a pause to revisit and rearticulate the values that guide our work as youth justice advocates.

What are the values that guide us in creating better alternatives to broken justice systems for youth? What should a continuum of responses look like for children in conflict with the law, from those who miss too many school days to those who commit more serious offenses?



[For more of this story, written by Patricia Soung and Dominique Nong, go to http://jjie.org/the-future-in-...more-prisons/300219/]

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I really like this article, being a juvenile corrections officer for 81/2 years and seeing the same kids come back made me think that something is wrong with our system, why isn't anything done for these kids to stop coming back and keeping the recidivism rate down in the adult and juvenile population?  Sadly the majority of my kiddos have ended up on drugs, homeless, prison and death. I feel something has to be done we need to start investing in our children for the better of our future and theirs.... Thank you for this article, I am now working as an educational advocate and work with youths who have just been recently released from juvenile detention centers and/or juvenile prisons. 

George Bernard Shaw is credited with the following quote:

"To Punish a Man, You must injure him; To Reform a man, You must improve him; and Men are not improved by injuries."

I don't know if being gender- specific or distinguishing between adults and juveniles is necessary, to appreciate and apply Shaw's reasoning to this issue.

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