Veterinarians Are Killing Themselves. An Online Group Is There To Listen And Help (npr.org)

 

Dr. Carrie Jurney is on the board of an online organization that works to prevent suicides. It's called Not One More Vet.

This isn't a mental health support group for veterans — it's for veterinarians.

Veterinarians are killing themselves in alarming numbers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found male vets are 2.1 times as likely and female vets 3.5 times as likely to die by suicide compared with the general population. The much higher rate for women is especially concerning as more than 60% of vets are women.

Vets deal with disease, disability and death on a daily basis: "our average Monday morning," as Jurney puts it.

Many veterinarians practice alone, and sometimes they are the only one practicing for hundreds of miles, making it hard to take time off.

It's a natural profession for introverts, says Dr. Nicole McArthur of Rocklin, Calif., the founder of Not One More Vet.

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McArthur and Jurney's group, Not One More Vet, tries to give veterinarians support and a sounding board for the stresses of their work. The Facebook group boasts more than 18,000 members.

It's not professional mental health support, but rather "a large group of veterinarians who totally understand where you are coming from," as NOMV says. "We are here to listen, commiserate, and give each other a shoulder, an ear, and a bit of advice when needed."

To read more of Scott Simon, Samantha Balaban, and James Doubeck's article, please click here.

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Thanks for sharing, Dana.

Alarming. Enlightening. Have shared with friends who are veterinarians. Have shared out on social media and I hope others will as well! 

I have always thought being a veterinarian would be such a hard, hard career. 

Pets play such an important role in recovery. Losing a beloved veterinarian to suicide would be a shock, a tragedy. 

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