March 2019

From Film Festival to City Council Chambers: Philadelphia ACE Task Force Charts a Path Toward Policy Change on Secondary Traumatic Stress

The path toward policies that would buffer Philadelphia workers from secondary traumatic stress began with a simple ask: Come see a movie. That movie was a documentary, Portraits of Professional CAREgivers: Their Passion, Their Pain , viewed by an audience of 250 as part of a 2016 film festival hosted by the Philadelphia ACE Task Force (PATF). The screening launched a three-year effort to put secondary traumatic stress on the radar of Philadelphia’s policy-makers—a journey of relationships...

The Surviving Spirit Newsletter March 2019

Healing the Heart Through the Creative Arts, Education & Advocacy Hope, Healing & Help for Trauma, Abuse & Mental Health “ Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars”. Kahlil Gibran The Surviving Spirit Newsletter March 2019 Hi Folks, Welcome to the March issue of the Surviving Spirit Newsletter...FYI, March is National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month & Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month, more...

Upstreamist in Action: In a Texas Clinic, Lawyers Are Health Care Providers [Health Begins]

Upstreamists are changemakers pioneering practices that improve health by blending medical and social care . In this series of profiles, HealthBegins highlights some of these bold leaders and their innovations, in settings large and small. Their stories show us that the journey upstream is not only necessary — it’s possible. The People’s partnership began in 2012, when two puzzle pieces clicked together. The clinic’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Louis Appel, a pediatrician with an interest in...

“I Like to Move It, Move It!" – How Dance and Rhythm Can Reduce the Impact of ACEs [stresshealth.org]

If you’ve watched “Madagascar,” you’re sure to have seen King Julien leading the jungle in a rousing chant of “I Like to Move It, Move It” while doing just that. It turns out King Julien was onto something. If the iconic lemur were a scientist, he might have written a dazzling paper on what our ancestors already knew: Dance can help heal what ails you. As it is, more and more researchers studying the healing power of rhythmic movement on people who’ve experienced trauma from Adverse...

Why this financial coach integrates ACEs-based training

In foreground, Dr. Donielle Prince (l) and Saundra Davis (r) ____________________________ Saundra Davis, a financial coach and consultant who trains other coaches on building resilience among the working poor, knew she had met her partner in helping people deal with their “money disorders” when she first met Dr. Donielle Prince in Sacramento at a black women’s gathering in 2015. Dr. Prince works with ACEs Connection as its San Francisco Bay Area regional community facilitator. She also...

Mental Health Law in the Philippines: 8 Things that You Need to Know About RA 11036 (Businesstips.ph)

"According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 24% of the global population or over 450 million people around the world suffer from different mental or neurological disorders – and unbeknownst to most, mental health issues are actually considered one of the leading causes of disability worldwide." "6. WHAT OPTIONS DID PATIENTS HAVE BEFORE THE RA 11036 WAS PASSED? Before the Mental Health Law was passed into law, there were only a few to no benefits that mental health patients can rely...

Many Guns, Few Mental Health Services Drive High Rural Death Rate, Experts Say [youthtoday.org]

Paul Reviere is sheriff of Lincoln County, a rural area with just under 8,000 people two hours east of Atlanta. In addition to maintaining safety, he gives what he calls “50-cent tours” to out-of-towners, showing off downtown Lincolnton. And there are lots of out-of-towners — people come to enjoy the nearby state park, the Savannah River and the 160 historic buildings. But Lincoln County is distinctive for something beyond these charms. It has the highest rate of firearm fatalities in...

What I Saw at the Dilley, Texas, Immigrant Detention Center [thenation.com]

W hen I first started to write this, I was crying. I was flying back from Dilley, Texas, the site of the largest family-detention center in the United States. It is 75 miles from the Texas-Mexico border. The center is actually a prison—an internment camp. I see the faces and hear the voices of the women and children I just left. Nearly every woman I saw seeking asylum came from the northern triangle of Central America: Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. They had come, primarily, not to...

In this California classroom, students teach each other their home languages — and learn acceptance [edsource.org]

In Acacia WoodsChan’s ethnic studies class at Castlemont High School in Oakland, California, students chat with each other in Spanish, Arabic and Mam, a Mayan language from Guatemala. The students have only been in the U.S. for a few weeks or months. Some are from Yemen and many are from countries in Central America — Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. Last year, WoodsChan became concerned when she started hearing the Spanish-speaking students laugh when their classmates spoke Mam or...

Broken Places after Screening Summary & Resources

Almost 2,500 ACEs Connection members signed up to watch the Broken Places documentary online on March 21st, which was made available for Vimeo streaming all day. We are grateful to KPJR Films for sharing this documentary and helping make this event happen (special thanks for the hard work of @lynn waymer, Keely Badger, @Gail Kennedy (ACEs Connection Staff), and @Carey S. Sipp (ACEs Connection Staff). Following the event, we had a one hour chat with featured guests and many of you have asked...

Claire's Story: Larry is convicted. Part 29.

By K. Hecht, A. Hosack, & P. Berman Court resumed. Claire was seated back between the Carson’s. The other witnesses were heard. The waitress looked scared whenever she glanced towards Larry. He thought she must be crazy. He was the one facing jail time, not her. Larry didn’t think of himself as violent, and he couldn’t imagine why the waitress would be afraid of him just because she saw him punch Claire. Larry didn’t know it, but it had taken support from the whole dinner staff to get...

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