April 2018

Podcast Interview with Will and Dr. Jackie Yancy

Pastor Will Yancy, M.A. Ed., and Jackie Yancy, PhD , MSC/MFCT lead Triumph Educational Center in Oakland, California. Here they lead domestic violence abusers through the 52 week court mandated batterer intervention program. They also train others in the community to recognize and respond to domestic violence. Both Will and Jackie have a lot to say about how to motivate change, as well as effective strategies to create safe and thriving families.

Trauma Informed Mindfulness: The First Do No Harm Training Program

"Meditation can lead people to some dark places, triggering trauma or leaving people feeling disoriented, according to Dr. Willoughby Britton, who has studied the adverse effects of contemplative practices for more than a decade. Now, she has teamed up with trauma specialist Dr. David Treleaven to help people work with these challenges. The First Do No Harm training program aims to make meditation safer, in part by recognizing its pitfalls."

'I don't want any kid to go through what I went through.' At child abuse forum in Gary, author speaks about how to overcome trauma. [kokomoperspective.com]

GARY — Shenandoah Chefalo moved 50 times and went to 35 different schools by the age of 12. She was raised by a mom who was bipolar and addicted to cocaine and alcohol. At 13, Chefalo went into foster care. Somehow, she was able to escape the path of substance abuse, incarceration and unwanted pregnancies that many people with childhood trauma follow. So she's made it her mission to help others go in a similarly positive direction. [For more on this story by Giles Bruce, go to...

Teachers watch over students' mental health [newstribune.com]

Jefferson City Public Schools is now screening most of its elementary students for mental health problems. Experts believe adverse childhood experiences can deeply affect the physical, social and emotional development of young children and those experiences can have effects much later in children's lives. Officials believe, with applications of interventions, the screenings will improve students' performance and increase the chances they'll be successful. The school system does the...

Year of Wellness: Relationships’ effect on our health [tillamookheadlightherald.com]

Health care professionals and social service providers understand that a person’s overall health is impacted more by what happens outside of the doctor’s office than by what happens during an annual visit. As YOW, a public health-focused initiative, convenes community partnerships and collaborators to formulate a plan to address the high rates of diabetes in Tillamook County, we are looking at root causes for type 2 diabetes and barriers to medical care for people who are pre-diabetic. That...

How Do American Kids Become Murderers?

Has murder become the norm in our society? Every day, you turn on the new to see who else got killed. I had to disconnect my cable TV because I just got so sick and tired of watching homicide news every day and see no change in our country's policies. No kid is born to become a murderer. Yet, our society somehow does a great job turning them into monsters. How? Liberty and freedom for all! Oh, really? Then why is the U.S. incarceration rate one of the highest in the world? Why is our...

Could Parkland Shooting Be Prevented? Yes, and Runcie Knew How

School safety, negligence documentation, and a need for a school reform My name is Natalia Garceau. For nine years, I’ve been working at a center similar to the one where Nikolas Cruz was sent to after his expulsion from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. You won’t hear anything from the teachers who work at such centers because they are afraid to lose their jobs and to be taken to court. They have families to feed. By contract, we are not allowed to speak with media about anything...

SAMHSA Technical Experts Meeting: Themes Parallel Traumatic Stress Institute Change Model to TIC

The research team of the Traumatic Stress Institute (TSI) of Klingberg Family Centers was honored to participate in SAMHSA’s recent national technical experts meeting titled Developing a Measurement Strategy and Metrics for Trauma-Informed Change in Behavioral and Health Settings. Dr. Steve Brown and Pat Wilcox from TSI and Dr. Courtney Baker from Tulane University attended the meeting. The gathering brought together experts and funders from across the US who are implementing and evaluating...

Staff leaders at American Psychiatric Association Foundation address mental health in the workplace, schools, and justice

With much on their plates to do prior to taking off for the May 5-9 Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), Darcy Gruttadaro, Director of APA Foundation’s Center for Workplace Mental Health and Christopher Seeley, the Foundation’s Program Director for School and Justice Initiatives met up with mental health advocate (and my husband) Bill Emmet and me for lunch near the APA’s new office at the waterfront in southwest Washington, DC. Both Gruttadaro and Seeley are...

Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits [sciencedaily.com]

Want to prevent kids from using drugs and make it stick into young adulthood? Get the community involved and intervene before they're teens, say researchers from the University of Washington. A new, longitudinal study from the UW Social Development Research Group shows that young adults who grew up in communities that used a coordinated, science-based approach to prevention were more likely to have abstained from substance use, violence and other antisocial behaviors through age 21.

Family Caregivers Finally Get A Break — And Some Coaching [npr.org]

For today, there are no doctor's visits. No long afternoons with nothing to do. No struggles over bathing. At the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., a group of older adults — some in wheelchairs, some with Alzheimer's — sit with their caregivers in a semicircle around a haunting portrait of a woman in white. "Take a deep breath," says Lorena Bradford , head of accessible programs at the National Gallery. She's standing before " The Repentant Magdalen " by Georges de La Tour. [For...

Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationships [sciencedaily.com]

Warm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. Researchers found that when adolescents reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies -- like providing reasons for decisions and refraining from harsh punishments -- those adolescents tended to go on to have better...

Defining Moments: How the Foster Care System Can Be a Stepping Stone [chronicleofsocialchange.org]

“I told them we were being taken and I didn’t know where we were going and when we were coming back.” That’s how Kaysie, then 14, recalls telling her friends about the fact that she and her siblings were headed to foster care. What was supposed to be a weekend stay turned into seven years in the system. The words strength and resilience are often used to characterize youth in care. They got through it because they are tough, they’re successful because they have grit. We want to find reasons...

Q&A: Donald Warne, MD, MPH American Indian physician, researcher seeks to mitigate effects of toxic stress in Indian Country [medpagetoday.com]

Donald Warne, MD, MPH, is the incoming associate dean of diversity, equity and inclusion at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences and an Oglala Lakota tribesman. Warne, who grew up in on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, recently spoke about inter-generational trauma and the Third World health conditions he sees in Indian Country at a healthcare journalists' meeting. MedPage Today caught up with him by phone to discuss some of the health...

Why a City at the Center of the Opioid Crisis Gave Up a Tool to Fight It [nytimes.com]

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — To its critics here, the needle exchange was an unregulated, mismanaged nightmare — a “mini-mall for junkies and drug dealers” in the words of Danny Jones, the city’s mayor — drawing crime into the city and flooding the streets with syringes. To its supporters, it was a crucial response to an escalating crisis, and the last bulwark standing between the region and a potential outbreak of hepatitis and H.I.V. When Charleston closed the program last month after a little more...

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