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June 2018

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Young Men of Color [FEBRUARY 5, 2018 BY ACCESS SACRAMENTO Reporting from Sacramento]

By Jazmine Justice-Young/Access Sacramento The term “Post Traumatic Stress Disorder” is defined by the National Institute of Mental Health as a disorder that can develop in people who have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous, and overall “traumatic” event. PTSD is most commonly associated with symptoms seen in returning war veterans, but an action brief released on the California Endowment’s homepage redefines the term in a way many services providers seem to overlook. The report...

The trauma of racism: Study published in The Lancet identifies link between police violence and community mental health for African Americans in the U.S.

Is racism an ACE? How about police violence? Outcomes seem to suggest so: "The magnitude of the mental health impairment black Americans experienced from police killing other unarmed black Americans was almost as big as the impairment associated with DIABETES" -Dr. Rhea Boyd. Links within include access to NYT article about the study, the original study, and commentary by Dr. Rhea Boyd.

No One Helped My Mentally Ill Mother, or Me [nytimes.com]

When I was 12, my mother cornered me in the bathroom of our suburban Vancouver home. “Your teeth are too yellow,” she said, handing me a can of Comet. Though disappointed that little about me ever pleased my parent, I understood from past experience how to get through the current predicament. I sprinkled green powder on my toothbrush and did my best to not let any of it go down my throat while I scrubbed. The things I didn’t do: report her to the authorities; confide in a reliable adult;...

Why Do We Have the Feeling That We Are Not Enough? (NAMI June Blog)

Mike believed he had a good life and felt lucky for all the things he had. He was married to a loving wife, had a good job, owned a nice house and had three healthy kids. Despite all his good fortune, Mike could not shake the nagging feeling that he wasn’t enough: "I should be more successful. I should make more money. I should be where my boss is. I should have a graduate degree. I should have a bigger house. I should have more friends." These were some of the “shoulds” that plagued him...

Twisted By Extreme Child Abuse, Man Is Rehabilitated By Loving Relationship [jjie.org]

Four months after he was released from prison, Steven Cave, 36, sat between the couple he calls his parents in Bloomsburg, Pa., and explained how their kindness showed him how to end a lifetime of chaos. “I never was big on words,” he said. That’s because Cave’s earliest memories are of his biological mother using words to mask a perverse pattern of abuse, sending him off with men and women she told him were uncles and aunts. [For more on this story by Micah Danney, go to...

Changes in stress after meditation [sciencedaily.com]

For a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now. U.S. Army Research Laboratory researchers spent a year collaborating with a team of scientists from the University of North Texas to develop a new data processing technique that uses heart rate variability as a sensor to monitor the state of the brain. Their findings are reported in a...

When a Suburb Tries to Densify, Forget ‘Minnesota Nice’ [citylab.com]

In late April, some residents of Normandale Lake Estates, an apartment complex in Bloomington, Minnesota, just outside of Minneapolis, received a letter informing them that their leases were being terminated and they’d have to move out by June 1. New owners had recently bought the building and planned to upgrade the units. Existing tenants were told they could prequalify to return, but many suspect the new rents will be higher than they can afford. In the meantime, they’re scrambling to find...

What I learned about ACEs on my Star Trek-like Sabbatical in Seattle

My Star Trek-like existence has ended. I returned recently to my home base of Santa Fe after a fascinating year sabbatical in Seattle. I was introduced to a very wealthy and wired city where most residents truly believe that there’s an app for everything. Not only could one beam in food, clothes and uber-like transport, but personal trainers/home chefs, massage therapists/house cleaners, existential therapists, counselors with specialties in seasonal affective disorder and socially-engaged...

It's Complicated: Teens, Technology & Relationships

Technology and social media shape the identities and world views of today’s young people. Teen sexuality, relationships, and identity are interwoven with cell phones and social media, and many parents and professionals are left wondering: what does it all mean? That's why I'm hosting a live, interactive webinar on Teens, Technology and Relationships. We will start from the ground up, beginning with definitions and a roadmap of technology commonly used by adolescents. From there, we will...

Only Some Correctional Staff Being Taught How to Handle Traumatized Inmates [jjie.org]

Steven Cave’s transformation happened in spite of a system that calls itself correctional but instead, he says, perpetuated his worst traumas, beliefs and behaviors. He entered that system in the state that has sentenced the most minors to life without parole, and where solitary confinement was a favorite method of punishment. In 2013, the Department of Justice found the state’s use of it in several facilities was unconstitutional. Pennsylvania was the first state to institute the practice...

"I: The Series" Exposes the Underside of Trauma and Healing [thefix.com]

We Q&A with filmmaker Mary Beth Eversole on trauma, the inspirations for her new series, and the challenges of making an indie film. Mary Beth Eversole is the creator and executive producer of I: The Series, in pre-production. The short film series explores the damage of trauma—from ordinary events to major catastrophes—and its impact on individuals as they learn how to heal. Episode 1 takes us into the mind of MB, a traumatized person dealing with an eating disorder, body dysmorphia,...

Improving Teaching Effectiveness: Final Report [rand.org]

The Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching initiative, designed and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was a multiyear effort to dramatically improve student outcomes by increasing students' access to effective teaching. Participating sites adopted measures of teaching effectiveness (TE) that included both a teacher's contribution to growth in student achievement and his or her teaching practices assessed with a structured observation rubric. The TE measures were to be...

How America Treats Its Own Children [theatlantic.com]

How could the United States do this? How could it separate 2,000 children from their parents, perhaps never to be reunited? How could it lose track of thousands more? How could it keep children in cages, in tents, in camps? This is a country that has assimilated wave after wave of immigrants and refugees, so that children might have a better life than their parents. This is the wealthiest civilization that the world has ever known, one with a bipartisan commitment to equality of opportunity...

The Tax on Black and Brown Customers When Dealing With Community Banks [citylab.com]

On May 24, a multi-racial gaggle of Congress members wriggled for prime positioning around Donald Trump as he prepared to sign the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act into law. The bill considerably scales back the Dodd-Frank Act reforms passed in 2010 in response to the financial crash and was passed with the votes of 33 Democrats in the House and 17 in the Senate. It essentially frees small community banks and credit unions from many of the Dodd-Frank...

A Landmark Study on the Origins of Alcoholism [theatlantic.com]

For Markus Heilig, the years of dead ends were starting to grate. A seasoned psychiatrist, Heilig joined the National Institutes of Health in 2004 with grand ambitions of finding new ways to treat addiction and alcoholism. “It was the age of the neuroscience revolution, and all this new tech gave us many ways of manipulating animal brains,” he recalls. By studying addictive behavior in laboratory rats and mice, he would pinpoint crucial genes, molecules, and brain regions that could be...

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