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September 2020

5 Effective Consequences of Bullying Behavior

For a long time, bullying was seen as a rite of passage. It built character and was purported to toughen kids up. A stereotypical belief that a victim has asked for it or done something to provoke the aggressor was prevalent. Children were also led to believe that they’re being bullied because they deserved it, often internalizing this emotion in the process. Society has changed and is constantly evolving. Bullying is no longer an expected or normalized behavior, and it should not be...

Why "Don't cry, be brave" Can Backfire - Parenting Center Tip of the Week [mountsinaiparenting.org]

Why "Don't cry, be brave" Can Backfire You may hear parents tell their children not to cry during stressful moments in the visit. Parents are often embarrassed that their child is upset, and feel pressure to get them to stop crying. In those instances, you can label and validate a child's emotions and let the parents know that it is OK for all feelings to be expressed in your office. You can say, "It's OK if you cry, I cry when I am scared too. You can sit on your mommy's lap and I will tell...

Positive Childhood Experiences in Ojibwe Culture [positiveexperience.org/blog]

By Zhawin Gonzalez (compiled by Chloe Yang), 9/30/20, positiveexperience.org/blog HOPE knows that all families, communities, and cultures have inherent strengths. In recent webinars with The Montana Institute , we’ve learned real world examples of this from co-presenters at the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC) . Zhawin Gonzalez, or Wasegabo, is the MIWRC Education and Resource Coordinator. In this blog post, Zhawin shares his insight on the long tradition of positive...

The Coronavirus Pandemic's Outsized Effect on Women's Mental Health Around the World [TIME]

COVID-19 is a devilishly versatile disease, attacking all manner of body systems and doing all manner of damage—to the lungs, the heart, the liver, the kidneys. Though it doesn’t attack the mind directly, the pandemic the virus has caused has been devastating to mental health, and in many cases, the most vulnerable group is women. In a new study conducted by CARE , a non-profit international aid organization, investigators have found that while almost nobody is spared from the anxiety, worry...

Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption [news.uci.edu]

By Nicole Feldman, University of California Irvine, September 18, 2020 Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic – such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study. The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “The pandemic is not hitting...

Pandemic Sets Off Future Wave of Worsening Mental Health Issues [uh.edu]

By Laurie Fickman, University of Houston, September 28, 2020 Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. Michael Zvolensky, University of Houston Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and director of the Anxiety and Health Research Laboratory/Substance Use Treatment Clinic, has...

Even when the smoke clears, schools find student trauma can linger [edsource.com]

By Carolyn Jones, EdSource, September 29, 2020 For some students, the fire is only the beginning. The nightmares, the grief and an all-consuming dread can persist for months or even years. That’s what teachers and school employees have observed among students in California’s fire-ravaged areas, especially Sonoma and Butte counties, where deadly wildfires have struck repeatedly in recent years. Now, those school districts are sharing their observations and advice with schools around the West...

Researchers Seek Reproductive Justice for Black Women [chcf.org]

By Vanessa Grubbs, California Health Care Foundation, September 25, 2020 Black mothers die in hospitals at nearly four times the rate of White mothers — an appalling disparity that has persisted for decades despite state and national quality improvement initiatives, clinical safety innovations, and technological advances. This disparity persists regardless of patient income, insurance, education, comorbid conditions, or prenatal care. The fact that many clinicians, decisionmakers, and...

Pandemic Highlights Deep-Rooted Problems in Indian Health Service [nytimes.com]

By Mark Walker, The New York Times, September 29, 2020 Matalynn Lee Tsosie showed up at the Indian Health Service hospital in Gallup, N.M., one day in April feeling poorly and having trouble breathing. When her coronavirus test came back positive, the hospital gave her a prescription for an inhaler, an oxygen tank and orders to go home and rest. Three days later Ms. Tsosie, a 40-year-old secretary for the local school system, was back at the hospital, this time in dire condition. But the...

Building Resilience in Children through Play

A big part of building resilience in children is to increase the amount of time we spend in healthy interaction with our children. The more positive interactions we have, the stronger our bonds to each other grow. The stronger the bonds, the more emotional stability a child will possess.

Youth-Led Advocacy Creates Healing Opportunities in Baltimore City

After a shooting at a historic Baltimore high school in February 2019—a 25-year-old man, angry about the school’s treatment of his sister, who was a student there, shot a special education assistant with a Smith and Wesson handgun—conversation in the city centered on whether school resource officers should be armed. Students said that was the wrong question. When City Council’s education and youth committee, chaired by council member Zeke Cohen, held hearings on school violence following the...

Prevention is Essential: Collective Impact Coalition Promotes Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships and Environments for All Maryland’s Children

When members of Maryland’s State Council on Child Abuse and Neglect (SCCAN) began in 2006 to examine what their state was doing in the realm of prevention, they discovered a gaping hole. Many participants in the 23-member Council—people working in child welfare, mental health, law enforcement and advocacy groups—knew about ACEs and about the corrosive effects of early childhood maltreatment. But they discovered, through informational interviews across different sectors and an environmental...

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