Blog

A soup kitchen disguised as a restaurant is making a big difference in Kansas City. [UpWorthy.com]

You might be surprised to find out that these beautiful dishes didn't come from a fancy restaurant or even a special at-home dinner. They're just a couple of typical meals from one of the country's most innovative soup kitchens. The restaurant-style Kansas City Community Kitchen is a completely new way to feed those in need. [For more of this story, by Morgan Shoaff, go to http://www.upworthy.com/a-soup-kitchen-disguised-as-a-restaurant-is-making-a-big-difference-in-kansas-city]

Bringing Mental Health Out of the Shadows [ElPasoInc.com]

Kristi Daugherty has come a long way, from a social worker in the field to a rising star as Emergence Health Network’s CEO, and she has brought El Paso’s non-profit mental health authority a long way, too. With a bachelor’s degree in social work from NMSU, she began her career in Alamogordo as a child protective services worker for children who were taken from their families. It was a tough job that gave her the chance to see how undiagnosed and untreated mental illness afflicted the lives...

When the Whole Family Goes to Pre-K [TheAtlantic.com]

A meaningful pre-kindergarten experience is increasingly seen as a critical part of a child’s education, and parents are expected to play a much more significant role. In this city, like many around the country, poorer families must first overcome powerful hurdles to be more present in their children’s education. That’s why Pre-K for San Antonio was designed to support and engage parents and extended families in ways that bolster their pre-schoolers’ chances to excel. [For more of this...

Where Children Rarely Escape Poverty [TheAtlantic.com]

Charlotte, North Carolina, wants to change its status as one of the worst places in the United States for poor children to have a shot at getting ahead as adults. If the city succeeds, its efforts may offer a roadmap for other major metro areas gripped by barriers such as concentrated poverty and school segregation. [For more of this story, written by Emily Deruy and Janie Boschma, go to http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/03/poor-children-rarely-escape-poverty-here/472002/]

Young and under the gun: Trials of growing up on Dade’s mean streets [MiamiHerald.com]

Inner city kids can’t escape it. Days after the crossfire death of young King Carter in Northwest Miami-Dade sparked marches and outrage, two 15-year-olds debated how police and emergency crews had handled another recent random killing. This one, a man shot while riding his bike near a corner store, went largely unnoticed outside their own Liberty City neighborhood. But it stuck in the mind of Anthony Sutton, who wondered why police didn’t cover the shirtless corpse. His friend Kiandra...

Prevent childhood abuse, trauma [WinonaPost.com]

When Sue LaFlash worked for the Wisconsin State Department of Health, she looked for research that explained what caused individuals to be violent, leading them on a path to sexual or physical assault. LaFlash ran across an Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) conducted in the 1990s by Dr. Vincent Felitti and Dr. Robert Anda. Kids who suffer from abuse or trauma often grow up to be abusers or troubled in some way. “The more I got into exploring it, the more I realized this is so...

Sanctuary Cities Are Here to Stay [CityLab.com]

Nearly seven months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice implemented a small procedural shift in the way it releases federal inmates who are tagged for deportation. Now, when those inmates have warrants out in any state or locality, federal immigration authorities have the first right to detain them and immediately begin deportation proceedings, even before the state or local matter is adjudicated. It’s a very specific, very technical shift, but it does result in some material changes to the...

For ACEsConnection members only -- a "sneak preview" of 'Resilience'!

Resilience , a documentary that looks at the birth of the CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and how it spawned a movement across the world, will be coming to your personal screen in April, says Lynn Waymer, KPJR Film’s community engagement strategist. The production team is working out the details to make the documentary, which premiered at Sundance Film Festival to sold-out houses, available to ACEsConnection.com members on Sunday, April 10, at 6 pm PT/ 9 pm...

Is 'Grit' Doomed To Be The New Self-Esteem? [NPR.org]

In just a few short weeks, students in California will be taking high-stakes tests. But the tests won't just cover math, reading and science. Students will also be responding to survey statements like "I usually finish what I start," or "I can do anything if I try." A group of big-city districts there is among the first to try to measure students' self-control, empathy and other social and emotional skills — and to hold schools accountable for the answers. [For more of this story, written by...

Boston’s Safe Space for Heroin Users [TheAtlantic.com]

A Boston nonprofit plans to soon test a new way of addressing the city’s heroin epidemic. The idea is simple: Starting in March, along a stretch of road that has come to be called Boston’s “Methadone Mile,” the program will open a room with a nurse, some soft chairs, and basic life-saving equipment—a place where heroin users can ride out their high, under medical supervision. Jessie Gaeta, the chief medical officer at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program , which initiated the...

What Costco's New Wages Say About the Health of the American Economy [TheAtlantic.com]

On Thursday, Costco announced that it will be raising wages for both new and current entry-level workers in the U.S. and Canada. The raise is small—$1.50 extra per hour—but it means that Costco will be paying workers at least $13 an hour, up from $11.50. This increase is significant because the company hasn’t raised wages for entry-level of workers in nine years, and its move to do so now might suggest that, as the economy adds jobs, retailers will have to start paying their frontline...

ReFraming the conversation on social issues and the connection to toxic stress

When communicating with the public or policymakers, nonprofits have long relied on a certain way of telling their stories and showing why the work of human service providers and advocates is so critical. But a new narrative is taking shape and many practitioners and advocates are leveraging the idea of “reframing” in order to be more effective in painting a picture of the scope and breadth of human services and how it impacts all members of society. Earlier this year, I had the pleasure of...

Washington: We Are the Movement

In Walla Walla, Washington, a banner made by penitentiary inmates stretched across Main Street. One side announced, “October Is Children’s Resilience Month.” The other read, “Resilience Trumps ACEs.” For Teri Barila, Coordinator of the Walla Walla Community Network, that 35-foot stretch of cloth is just one of the small ripples that, when added up, create a tide of change across the state. Barila was struck by hearing Rob Anda, co-investigator of the ACE Study, at a conference in 2007. He...

People Are Distressed, Not Communities [PSMag.com]

The Economic Innovation Group recently published the Distressed Communities Index . As the most distressed largecity in the United States, Cleveland dove into a Rust Belt shame spiral . The EIG managed to re-light the river fire. The Mistake on the Lake burns again. That's too bad, because the DCI is deeply flawed. While the DCI does not measure population change, such data can help explain why places where manufacturing once blossomed seem to rule the bottom of every list. Such cities tend...

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