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Mentoring's Promise and Limits [TheAtlantic.com]

When Leo Hall was 8 years old, his mother sent him to a tutoring program that served the African American and low-income neighborhood of the Cabrini-Green public-housing projects where they lived in Chicago. There, he met a volunteer tutor, Daniel Bassill, who helped him with homework, played chess and backgammon with him, and talked about growing up. "Dan was there as a male friend, a mentor, somebody I could talk to," Hall recalled. He was "a father figure, a big brother, a friend." That...

'I cried all the way home': Santa Claus grants final wish to a dying child NOW WATCHING:RAW: SANTA DESCRIBES GRANTING CHILD'S LAST CHRISTMAS WISH [King5.com]

Eric Schmitt-Matzen looks every bit like Santa Claus. His 6-foot frame carries 310 pounds, leaving “just enough of a lap for the kids to sit on,” he says with a gentle Kringley chuckle right out of Central Casting. No fake facial fuzz for this guy. Schmitt-Matzen’s snowy beard is the real thing, albeit regularly bleached to maintain its whiteness. His shag is so spectacular, in fact, it won first place in the “natural full beard, styled moustache” division of a 2016 national contest...

Hanna Boys Center Presents a No Cost Movie Screening of Redford’s RESILIENCE [PRWeb.com]

Hanna Boys Center, in partnership with the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance, announced today it will be offering a free screening of the documentary film: RESILIENCE: THE BIOLOGY OF STRESS AND THE SCIENCE OF HOPE, on January 18th, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. This event will include the film, a panel discussion and question and answer time from the audience. It is designed for organizational leaders, educators, mentors, health care providers, caregivers and parents to better understand the impact of...

West Virginia still leads the nation in overdose deaths [Register-Herald.com]

According to recently released Centers For Disease Control and Prevention statistics, West Virginia still leads the nation for overdose deaths. More than double the national average, West Virginia saw 39.3 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2015. Rates in southern West Virginia are substantially higher — In Raleigh County, the rate is 78.7 and in Wyoming County, the rate is 108.3. These statistics were reviewed Tuesday at a West Virginians for Affordable Health Care forum in Huntington, a city...

Here Are Four Myths About Diversity in Science [PSMag.com]

There’s been a lot of talk about diversity in science lately: Minority scientists have written op-eds about their struggles; science’s top journals cover the issue extensively; and one 47-year-old untenured female scientist recently sued the National Institutes of Health for gender discrimination. But what if we’re getting it all wrong? Yes, there are very real benefits to expanding the number of racial, sexual, socioeconomic, and other minorities in charge of labs; the problem is in our...

Commissioner reviews YOW’s healthy progress in 2016 [NorthCoastCitizen.com]

From an acorn of an idea to bring all of our health care providers together to come up with one area we could all work on collaboratively, to the finished product where we have over 60 organizations involved in helping our residents make healthy choices in diet, exercise and lifestyle. The Year of Wellness has accomplished much over the past 12 months. We have a monthly newsletter promoting free and low-cost events, which represent interests of all ages and ethnicities, and include all areas...

Where You Live May Determine How You Die [Consumer.HealthDay.com]

People along the southern stretch of the Mississippi River are more likely to die from heart problems than anywhere else in the United States. Suicide and homicide will claim the most lives in the southwestern part of the country. Deaths from chronic respiratory diseases are greatest in eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia. And mental and substance abuse disorders cause the most deaths in Alaska, eastern Arizona, New Mexico, eastern Kentucky and southwestern West Virginia. What causes...

Draw From Juvenile Justice System’s Strengths for Better Approaches for Young Adults [JJIE.org]

During the past decade and a half, the number of young people confined or placed out of the home in the juvenile justice system has been cut in half. While there is still much more progress to be made — the country is still incarcerating far too many young people, particularly young people of color — what is happening in the juvenile justice system stands in stark contrast to the challenges seen in reducing adult imprisonment. In an effort to kick-start change in adult criminal justice...

Report: Communities Must Switch to Local Care, Not Prisons, for Young Offenders [JJIE.org]

Many policymakers and advocates know they want to close youth prisons, where they say young offenders are often isolated, unsafe and go without the services they need to thrive when they return to their communities. But what would the alternative look like? A new report released by The National Collaboration for Youth lays out the case for investment in a community-based continuum of care that is rooted in the needs of individual jurisdictions. While many communities have nonresidential...

The American Obsession With Parenting [TheAtlantic.com]

The word “parent” wasn’t used as a verb until a few decades ago . In fact, some experts argue it was only in the 1990s that the idea of “parenting” really became a full-fledged “thing.” By that time, at least for members of the middle class, being a parent didn’t just mean serving as an authority figure and a source of sustenance and support for a child—it meant molding that child’s life, flooding her with opportunity so she could have a competitive edge in the long-term, and enriching her...

Why Are So Many Americans Dying Young? [TheAtlantic.com]

For the first time since the 1990s, Americans are dying at a faster rate, and they’re dying younger. A pair of new studies suggest Americans are sicker than people in other rich countries, and in some states, progress on stemming the tide of basic diseases like diabetes has stalled or even reversed. The studies suggest so-called “ despair deaths” —alcoholism, drugs, and suicide—are a big part of the problem, but so is obesity, poverty, and social isolation. American life expectancy fell by...

Telling Their Life Stories, Older Adults Find Peace in Looking Back [NYTimes.com]

ISABELLA S. BICK’S parents, both Jewish physicians, never talked about the past after the family moved from Fascist Italy to the United States in 1939. She was 8 at the time and quickly learned it was best to keep her feelings of loss and loneliness to herself. Her silence ended — and those emotions broke free — when Ms. Bick, now 84 and a psychotherapist living in Sharon, Conn., began writing bits and pieces of her life story a few years ago. In one vignette, she describes the trauma of...

Silicon Valley getting serious about severe housing shortage [SFChronicle.com]

In the 18 years since Google was born in a garage, Mountain View has ridden a wave of unprecedented job growth. But alongside the boom has come a slew of other issues familiar across the Bay Area: soaring rents, snarled traffic and people living in vehicles because they can’t afford apartments . Google is starting to address the crisis head-on. Its parent company, Alphabet, which employs more than 20,000 people in a city of 80,000, has proposed building 330 units of housing not far from its...

Talking Back to Hate Speech, Explained. [BillMoyers.com]

From a reader, Sara Gunther: “I am extremely concerned about all the hate crimes I am reading about. What can I do if I witness a bias attack?” Short answer: We reached out to experts to devise a strategy. Here’s what they recommend: 1) Be a good witness, record and identify the incident. 2) Be prepared to speak out, but don’t escalate the conflict. 3) Be an ally. 4) Find a safe space. 5) Learn more. 1. Be a good witness Report it. “First of all,” said J. Thomas Manger, police chief of...

Severe Inequality Is Incompatible With the American Dream [TheAtlantic.com]

The numbers are sobering: People born in the 1940s had a 92 percent chance of earning more than their parents did at age 30. For people born in the 1980s, by contrast, the chances were just 50-50. The finding comes from a new paper out of The Equality of Opportunity Project , a joint research effort of Harvard and Stanford led by the economist Raj Chetty. The paper puts numbers on what many have seen firsthand for years: The American dream—the ability to climb the economic ladder and achieve...

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