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Women's History Month

Malala Yousafzai

At age eleven, Malala Yousafzai was already advocating for the rights of women and girls. As an outspoken proponent for girls’ right to education, Yousafzai was often in danger because of her beliefs. However, even after being shot by the Taliban, she continued her activism and founded the Malala Fund with her father. By age seventeen, Yousafzai became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her work. Malala Yousafzai was born on July 12, 1997 in Mingora, Pakistan. Mingora...

Kimberly Teehee

Over 200 years ago, the United States signed a treaty with the Cherokee Nation, granting them representation in Congress. However, this position was never filled until Kimberly Teehee entered the scene. In 2019, Teehee became the first Cherokee Nation delegate in the House of Representatives. As a lawyer, activist, and former advisor to President Obama, Teehee has quickly become a monumental figure in history. Kimberly Teehee was born on March 2, 1966 in Chicago, Illinois. Due to a federal...

Recy Taylor

Although it was very dangerous for African Americans to speak out against white people during the Jim Crow era, Recy Taylor refused to remain silent about sexual violence. She bravely testified against the group of white men that kidnapped and raped her. Decades later, her story has been told in both a book and a documentary film. Recy Taylor was born as Recy Corbitt on December 31, 1919. She grew up in Abbeville, Alabama to a sharecropping family. When she was 17 years old, her mother died...

Queen Lili‘uokalani

Growing up in a royal family, Queen Lili‘uokalani was trained to be a monarch. Even though becoming queen was probably not a surprise to her, she may not have known that she would also become the last sovereign monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Unfortunately, she was only able to reign for three years because the United States overthrew the Hawaiian monarchy. However, Lili‘uokalani published her side of the story in a memoir that became the only autobiography written by a Hawaiian monarch.

Janet Mock

New York Times bestselling author Janet Mock continues to make history as a writer, director, and advocate. In 2018, Mock became the first transgender woman of color to write and direct an episode of television. Most recently, she signed a three-year multimillion-dollar contract with Netflix, making her the first openly transgender woman of color to sign a deal with a major content company. Mock hopes that her creations will continue to “empower people and equip them to tell their own...

Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta

Co-founder of the United Farm Workers Association, Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta is one of the most influential labor activists of the 20 th century and a leader of the Chicano civil rights movement. Born on April 10, 1930 in Dawson, New Mexico, Huerta was the second of three children of Alicia and Juan Fernandez, a farm worker and miner who became a state legislator in 1938. Her parents divorced when Huerta was three years old, and her mother moved to Stockton, California with her...

Amanda Blackhorse

Amanda Blackhorse has always seen Native American women fighting against injustice. Blackhorse, member of the Navajo Nation, a social worker and mother of two, served as the named plaintiff in the 2006 lawsuit Blackhorse et al v. Pro-Football Inc. Blackhorse continues to fight for justice and respect for Native Americans and is one of many Native American activists who deserves credit for the proposed name change from the Washington Football Team, formerly called the “Redskins.” Born on...

Adelina Otero-Warren

Adelina Otero-Warren, the first Hispanic woman to run for U.S. Congress and the first female superintendent of public schools in Santa Fe, was a leader in New Mexico’s woman’s suffrage movement. She emphasized the necessity of Spanish in the suffrage fight to reach Hispanic women and spearheaded the lobbying effort to ratify the 19th amendment in New Mexico. She strove to improve education for all New Mexicans, working especially to advance bicultural education and to preserve cultural...

Corazon “Cory” Aquino

Corazon “Cory” Aquino went from a shy law school student, to the first female president of the Philippines. Supported by the People Power Revolution, Aquino successfully ran a peaceful movement that eventually led her to become TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year in 1986. The only other woman that received that honor at the time was Queen Elizabeth II in 1952. Corazon Aquino was born on January 25, 1933 in Paniqui, Tarlac in the Philippines. Her birth name was Maria Corazon Sumulong...

Secretary Deb Haaland

Congratulations to Deb Haaland for becoming this country's first Indigenous Secretary of the Interior! Deb Haaland made history in 2018 as one of the first Native American women elected to Congress and she continues to make history today as the first Native American to ever hold a Cabinet position. As the head of the Department of the Interior, Haaland will oversee federal agencies whose operations and policies directly impact Indian Country in a multitude of ways. To have a Native lead one...

Antonia Hernández

According to Antonia Hernández, she “went to law school for one reason: to use the law as a vehicle for social change.” Decades later, she can claim numerous legal victories for the Latinx community in the areas of voting rights, employment, education, and immigration. From legal aid work, to counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee, to head of a major civil rights organization, Hernández has used the law to realize social change at every turn. Antonia Hernández was born in Torreón, Mexico...

Stacey Abrams

The name Stacey Abrams has become synonymous with voting accessibility and turnout, making history by becoming the first woman and first African American woman to hold positions in state and national politics. Abrams is now one of the most prominent African American female politicians in the United States. Stacey Yvonne Abrams was born on December 9, 1973 in Madison, Wisconsin. Her mother, Carolyn, was a college librarian and her father, Robert, was a shipyard worker. Coming of age amidst...

Loretta Perfectus Walsh

FIRST FEMALE TO ENLIST IN THE U.S. NAVY. SIGNIFICANT DUTY STATIONS NAVAL SHIPYARD, PHILADELPHIA SIGNIFICANT AWARDS WORLD WAR I VICTORY MEDAL SERVICE MEMORIES FIRST FEMALE TO ENLIST IN THE NAVY The U.S. Naval Reserve Act of 1916 permitted the enlistment of qualified “persons” for service in the Navy. When the Secretary of the Navy asked whether this applied only to males and was told that it did not, the Navy began enlisting women less than a month later. Historical records reflect that on...

Renee Richards | Juliette Gordon Low | Angie Xtravaganza |

Renee Richards Long before Caitlyn Jenner came out, pro-tennis player Renee Richards shook up the sports world when she came out as a transgender woman. She made even greater waves later, when she returned to tennis and sued the United States Tennis Association, the Women's Tennis Association, and the United States Open Committee for her right to compete as a woman. Although she was one of the first to take on that battle (and win!), Richards doesn't consider herself a pioneer. She told GQ...

Simone de Beauvoir | Marlene Dietrich | Bell Hooks

Simone de Beauvoir An outspoken political activist, writer and social theorist, in 1949 de Beauvoir wrote The Second Sex , an ahead-of-its-time book credited with paving the way for modern feminism. In the influential (and at the time, extremely controversial) book, de Beauvoir critiques the patriarchy and social constructs faced by women. The Second Sex was banned by The Vatican and even deemed "pornography" by some —a fearless start to the fight for feminism. Marlene Dietrich While her...

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