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More than 1 in 4 Latino, Black, and White families with low incomes experience disruptions in their child care and work schedules

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More than 1 in 4 Latino, Black, and White families with low incomes experience disruptions in their child care and work schedules

A new report from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families finds that disruptions in child care and work schedules are common among Latino, Black, and White families with low incomes. Forty-nine percent of Latino, Black, and White families who experienced a care-work disruption that affected their work schedule lost pay as a result of this disruption.

Twenty-four percent of children and youth in foster care have a special health care need

New Child Trends research provides national and state-level estimates of the number of children and youth with special health care needs in the foster care system. The research finds that Black and Hispanic children and youth in foster care were more likely to have been identified with a special health care need than their peers in other racial/ethnic groups. This may highlight provider biases in the child welfare and health care systems.

KCRW, a California NPR member station, cited Child Trends as a resource in an article about how parents can help kids cope with the challenges facing the world today. The article refers to Child Trends' resources for supporting the well-being of children during the pandemic and when facing anti-Black racism and racial violence. Children are more vulnerable to the emotional impact of traumatic events. However, caregivers should also remember to make space to understand their own emotional response to traumatic events, which can prepare them to help children of all ages cope with and discuss their experiences.

KCRW shares Child Trends resources on promoting children’s well-being

KCRW, a California NPR member station, cited Child Trends as a resource in an article about how parents can help kids cope with the challenges facing the world today. The article refers to Child Trends' resources for supporting the well-being of children during the pandemic and when facing anti-Black racism and racial violence. Children are more vulnerable to the emotional impact of traumatic events. However, caregivers should also remember to make space to understand their own emotional response to traumatic events, which can prepare them to help children of all ages cope with and discuss their experiences.

K-12 Dive cites Child Trends’ research on out-of-school suspensions

K-12 Dive cited a 2019 Child Trends brief, in which education experts Kristen Harper, Renee Ryberg, and Deborah Temkin wrote that schools suspend Black students at rates more than two times as high as white students. The question of school discipline during remote learning has led to discussion of reforming disciplinary practices and making sure that—when it is safe for schools to reopen—teachers and staff are equipped to handle student discipline without relying on time out of the classroom.

                       

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