ACEs in Early Childhood

Identify and promote practices that build child caregiver capabilities and improve child outcomes including: the impact of childcare business decisions; building child caregiver skills and resilience; child caregiver turnover; child caregiver ACE histories and healthy boundaries in the workplace.

Tagged With "child development"

Comment

Re: Child Care Bridge Program with Trauma-Informed Training

Former Member ·
What encouraging news to know that our legislators are considering the role of trauma in the lives of foster children and supporting caregivers. ACEs science advocates can make a big difference by weighing in on the bill and its implementation (if passed) to ensure there is meaningful training and support around trauma. Too often, implementing organizations can claim to be "trauma informed" or provide "trauma informed training", but we need to make sure the training and supports around...
Blog Post

Child Care Bridge Program with Trauma-Informed Training

Jennifer Rexroad ·
More foster and relative homes are needed across the country. One barrier is child care access. A new bill seeks to solve this problem by providing a child care bridge program with a trauma informed training component. http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/op-ed/soapbox/article147546504.html
Comment

Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Hi, Jill: This sounds really interesting. Do you have a direct link to the module? When I go to the link listed on the handout — https://extension.psu.edu/programs/betterkidcare — it's not apparent how to find this module. Thank you!
Comment

Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Jill Cox ·
Hi Jane - On the left hand side of the home page is a blue tab "On Demand Web Lessons". Click on that tab and it will take you to the page to set up an account in our system which any one can do free of charge. Once in the system, you scroll through the module titles and click on Adverse Childhood Experiences: Building Resilience. Thank you for your interest and please let me know if you have any other questions!
Comment

Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Thanks, Jill. But I have to fill out a form and set up an account first, right?
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Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Jill Cox ·
Correct. It can all be done online and there is no cost to setting up an account.
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Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Why does the organization need my home address?
Comment

Re: Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Jill Cox ·
This is one of the ways providers are identified in our system. We do not provide that information to anyone else nor are there mailings that sent as a result of providing that information.
Blog Post

Online On Demand trauma awareness training for early care and education professionals

Jill Cox ·
Penn State Better Kid Care offers an online, On Demand trauma awareness training geared specifically for early care and education professionals. This 2-hr training promotes the awareness and understanding of trauma in young children and families, and addresses the role of early care and education professionals in nurturing resilience in the children and families in their care who have experienced ACEs. More information and how to access the module is included in the attached handout.
Blog Post

Revisiting a Wonderful Resource

Leslie Lieberman ·
Today I stumbled on an "old" resource and was reminded about what great and accessible information it has.   Calmer Classrooms   was published in 2007 by the Child Safety Commissioner in Victoria Australia. It is full of excellent and...
Blog Post

Raising The Organic Unity Of Child-And-Community

Bob Lancer ·
“When a child displays a behavior problem, the first place to look for the cause and for the solution is to the child’s environment.” Maria Montessori We cannot truly separate the child from the community. In our efforts to “fix” child behavior or heal the child from the traumatic impact of adverse childhood experiences, we need to relate to the community as an extension of the child’s physical and psychological constitution. An organic unity operates here. There is more than just a...
Blog Post

43 Amazing Benefits of Child-led Free Play

Neve Spicer ·
Self-directed free play is vital for the healthy development of children. Here we see 43 science-backed benefits it brings.
Reply

Re: ISO Trauma-Informed Child Care Programs

Leslie Lieberman ·
Hi Suzanne look you might want to look at, talk to Head Start, Trauma Smart in Kansas City and/or talk with Chris Blodgett in Washington State about his work with Head Start programs there. Let me know if you need more info.
Reply

Re: ISO Trauma-Informed Child Care Programs

Shannon Lipscomb ·
Hi Suzanne, I just found your post and I'd love to chat with you! I don't run a child care program myself but this is a key area of research and development for me! My team and I have created and are testing out Roots of Resilience: Teachers Awakening Children's Healing. It's designed specifically for child care providers & early childhood teachers working with children impacted by trauma. I also conduct related research to find ways to realize the potential of Early Care and Education...
Reply

Re: ISO Trauma-Informed Child Care Programs

Domenica Benitez ·
Hi Suzanne, Shannon, and Leslie - We're researching potential curricula to use specifically with Family Child Care Providers, here in California. Would Roots of Resilience and other references be tailored meet their needs as well? Also, do you know whether any of these qualify for IV-E federal funding/reimbursement? Thank you, in advance
Ask the Community

ISO Trauma-Informed Child Care Programs

Suzanne O'Connor ·
Greetings! I was wondering if anyone is aware of a child care program that would consider themselves "Trauma-Informed" - implementing trauma-informed practices throughout their program. I'd like to reach out to them for an interview, with the potential of being featured in an upcoming publication. Thank you! Suzanne,
Reply

Re: ISO Trauma-Informed Child Care Programs

Bob Lancer ·
I would be delighted to discuss my trauma-informed trainings. I provide accredited trainings to early childhood teachers and family child care providers. So many of these professionals emerge from adverse childhood experiences! My work with them focuses on improving their emotional self-management through the "rebuilding of their mindsets and restructuring their brain patterns". I do this through teaching and training them in The 7 Mindsets demonstrated by those who have overcome life's...
Blog Post

An Invitation to Co-Create Change and Shift Your Mindset

Jessie Graham ·
We are not born “normal” or “disordered” or with a “disability” we “are born” and “we develop” in many different ways. Along our path of development we will encounter various influences and each individual will respond to those experiences differently. The brain actually continues to develop well into adulthood!
Blog Post

New Report Explores Paid Family Leave: How Much Time is Enough?

Brigid Schulte ·
A growing body of research is finding that, on the whole, job-protected paid family leaves of adequate duration and wage replacement lead to more income and gender equality, significant reductions in infant, maternal and even paternal mortality, improved physical and mental health for children and parents, greater family stability and economic security, business productivity, and economic growth.
Blog Post

Two New Grant Opportunities for Youth Development and Diversion Services

Briana S. Zweifler ·
In 2019, more than $40 million will become available to fund community-based, culturally rooted, trauma-informed services for youth in California as alternatives to arrest and incarceration. Thousands of California youth are arrested every year for low-level offenses. Youth who are arrested or incarcerated for low-level offenses are less likely to graduate high school, more likely to suffer negative health-outcomes, and more likely to have later contact with the justice system.
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