How Severe, Ongoing Stress can Affect a Child's Brain [Associated Press via kstp.com]

 

A quiet, unsmiling little girl with big brown eyes crawls inside a carpeted cubicle, hugs a stuffed teddy bear tight, and turns her head away from the noisy classroom.

The safe spaces, quiet times and breathing exercises for her and the other preschoolers at the Verner Center for Early Learning are designed to help kids cope with intense stress so they can learn. But experts hope there's an even bigger benefit — protecting young bodies and brains from stress so persistent that it becomes toxic.

Photo caption:  Amy Band, top, shows children items on a lightbox at the Verner Center in Asheville, N.C., on March 23, 2017. Safe spaces, quiet times and breathing exercises for the preschoolers are designed to help kids cope with intense stress so they can learn.

Photo credit: AP/Chuck Burton
 

[To read more of this article and view the accompanying video from the Associated Press via kstp.com, visit http://kstp.com/medical/toxic-...ain-effects/4539866/]

 

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