One Teacher’s Heartfelt Strategy to Stop Future School Shootings—And It’s Not About Guns [msn.com]

 

A few weeks ago, I went into my son Chase’s class for 
tutoring. I’d e-mailed Chase’s teacher one evening and said, 'Chase keeps telling me that this stuff you’re sending home 
is math—but I’m not sure I believe him. Help, please.' She 
e-mailed right back and said, 'No problem! I can tutor Chase after school anytime.' And I said, 'No, not him. Me. He gets it. Help me.'

And that’s how I ended up standing at a chalkboard in an empty fifth-grade classroom while Chase’s teacher sat behind me, using a soothing voice to try to help me understand the 'new way we teach long division.' Luckily for me, I didn’t 
have to unlearn much because I’d never really understood 
the 'old way we taught long division.' It took me a solid hour to complete one problem, but I could tell that Chase’s teacher liked me anyway. She used to work with NASA, so obviously 
we have a whole lot in common.

Afterward, we sat for a few minutes and talked about 
teaching children and what a sacred trust and responsibility 
it is. We agreed that subjects like math and reading are not the most important things that are learned in a classroom. 
We talked about shaping little hearts to become contributors to a larger community—and we discussed our mutual dream that those communities might be made up of individuals 
who are kind and brave above all.

And then she told me this.

[To read the rest of this article by Glennon Doyle Melton, click here.]

Photo: © Getty Images

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Jennifer Lynn-Whaley posted:

Laura - thank you so much for re-posting this blog. I turn to it again and again. The part about how every outward act of violence begins with inner loneliness is a kernel of truth that feels like the very reason we talk about the importance of relationship building, and asking questions like what happened to you? What's going on at home? I sent this to a handful of teachers at my kids' elementary school as well as to principals in the district I'm working with to support trauma informed practices. Thanks again!! 

You're welcome, Jennifer. I shared it here because I feel like the teacher described in the article "gets it" -- and it's at the heart of why I believe so many of us choose to gather here on ACN for sharing and discussion.

Laura - thank you so much for re-posting this blog. I turn to it again and again. The part about how every outward act of violence begins with inner loneliness is a kernel of truth that feels like the very reason we talk about the importance of relationship building, and asking questions like what happened to you? What's going on at home? I sent this to a handful of teachers at my kids' elementary school as well as to principals in the district I'm working with to support trauma informed practices. Thanks again!! 

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