Still haven't registered? Here are the Top 5 Reasons you shouldn't miss the 2018 ACEs Conference and Pediatric Symposium!

 
Reason #1Hear from experts in the field like Dr. Nadine Burke Harris and Dr. Jonathan Goldfinger. In addition you will get a chance to hear from an ACEs screening panel focused on developing screening protocols and integrated care as well as hear the perspectives of those who are already screening.
Reason #2Come visit one of the most beautiful cities in the US - and earn 3.5 CMEs while you're here! The California Medical Association/Institute for Medical Quality (CMA/IMQ) designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Attendance certificates are also available upon request for both the Symposium and the Conference!
Reason #3: Meet other NPPC members. You will have an opportunity to network and connect with others who are also interested in the the ACEs screening process. In addition you will get the opportunity learn about and engage with platforms, programs, interventions that enhance and bolster the ACEs screening experience at our Intervention Modality Expo.
Reason #4: Discounts - you can't afford NOT to go! If you are an NPPC member, email lmedoff@centerforyouthwellness.org  to get 15% off a regular priced Pediatric Symposium ticket or 15% off the cost of a regular Pediatric Symposium+Conference ticket. If you are a student or resident physician interested in ACEs we are offering a great deal. $250 pricing for Pediatric Symposium registration! And last but not least don't miss out on hotel discounts that end 9/14/18. Book at The Hyatt Regency for $359/NightHotel Griffon ($289/night for European-style Queen room) or Omni San Francisco ($369/night for Deluxe King room).
Reason #5: Be a part of a growing international movement! With 600 members in the NPPC and 6 pilot sites, the tides are turning toward trauma-informed care and universal screening for ACEs. Now is the time to join in the discussion and help usher in a new era where a future of chronic disease and early death is no longer a foregone conclusion for children with ACEs!

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