June 2018

Self-Healing Communities Model

“The Self-Healing Communities Model (SHCM) builds the capacity of communities to intentionally generate new cultural norms and thereby improve health, safety and productivity for current and future generations.” This model was implemented in Washington State and was successful in improving rates of many interrelated and intergenerational health and social problems by investing in the people at risk. They worked to reduce and prevent the root of the issue being Adverse Childhood Experiences...

Recently released research on ACEs; incarceration; separating families at the border

Behavioral risk factor surveillance system state survey on exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs): Who declines to respond? [Children and Youth Services Review] "A wealth of research has examined the prevalence and impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) via various research methodologies. Some of these studies have also examined the presence of nonresponse bias, showing minimal nonresponse bias effects. More recently, many states and the District of Columbia have used the...

Essentials for Childhood Framework

From the CDC’s Injury Prevention & Control, Division of Violence Prevention: "Safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments are essential to prevent child abuse and neglect and to assure all children reach their full potential. The Essentials for Childhood Framework proposes strategies communities can consider to promote relationships and environments that help children grow up to be healthy and productive citizens so that they, in turn, can build stronger and safer families and...

Nearly 20 communities on ACEs Connection launch Community Presentation Trackers

As part of the rollout of Growing Resilient Communities 2.0 late last year, we provided communities with an interactive tool that maps the presentations a local ACEs science initiative does in that community. So far, nearly 20 communities, out of about 150 on ACEs Connection, have launched presentation trackers, including Maryland and Arkansas. (A full list is at the bottom of this blog post.) Growing Resilience Communities 2.0 provides communities basic guidelines to growing their ACEs...

Addressing Trauma and Building Resiliency as Comprehensive Disaster Planning and Response

The attached memo is intended to make observations about communities affected by disaster-related trauma, and to offer recommendations for trauma-informed recovery. Community examples provide case studies or models for other communities grappling with similar issues. Suggested resources and tools provide communities with support for accelerated action. Memo authors represent active cross sector networks that contribute to resilient community infrastructure development, awareness building,...

The trauma of racism: Study published in The Lancet identifies link between police violence and community mental health for African Americans in the U.S.

Is racism an ACE? How about police violence? Outcomes seem to suggest so: "The magnitude of the mental health impairment black Americans experienced from police killing other unarmed black Americans was almost as big as the impairment associated with DIABETES" -Dr. Rhea Boyd. Links within include access to NYT article about the study, the original study, and commentary by Dr. Rhea Boyd.

Trauma-Informed Policing

(Becky Haas, Community Crime Prevention Programs, Johnson City Police Department) Since first hearing about trauma-informed care in 2014, and then setting out on a journey to bring this education to my community, I’m constantly amazed at how this message is being embraced in Johnson City, Tennessee. After partnering with Dr. Andi Clements from the East Tennessee State University Psychology Department, in a little over 2 years we have trained over 2,500 professionals! This growing number of...

How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful [Greater Good Magazine]

Does your job suck? Neuroscience research suggests it might be missing two key ingredients. BY PAUL J. ZAK | JUNE 6, 2018 Let’s be honest: For many people, work sucks. But for others, work is an adventure. The difference doesn’t always lie in the nature of the work. Two different people can have two very different responses to the same job—but my research has also shown that organizational culture makes a huge difference in how we feel about, and perform, at work. I spent eight years...

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