Blog posts -- Legislation & policies

ACEs Connection “Map the Movement” now includes an up-to-date section on laws and resolutions

Photo credit: Texasarchitects.org An updated map of laws and resolutions addressing ACEs science and trauma-informed policies is now available in the “Laws and Resolutions” section of Map the Movement (you can also find "Map the Movement" on the navigation bar on the ACEs Connection home page). The earliest law on the map was passed in the state of Washington in 2011, creating an ACEs science public-private partnership. The data base of the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) is...

New 2020 law #3: California limits when police can use deadly force (calmatters.org)

Starting Jan. 1, police can legally use deadly force only when “necessary in defense of human life.” That’s a higher standard than prosecutors apply now, when officers are permitted to use such force when it is “reasonable.” An iteration of the change was first introduced in 2018 after unarmed Stephon Clark was killed by Sacramento police. The bill stalled until civil rights groups and police struck a compromise, securing passage in the Legislature and Gov. Gavin Newsom’s signature . In this...

How Does Racism Affect Health? California Doctors Speak Out (calhealthreport.org)

Medical providers in California and nationwide are increasingly recognizing that racism and discrimination affect children’s health, and they’re seeking to tackle the problem. Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued its first policy statement on how racism affects the health and development of children and teens. The academy called racism a “socially transmitted disease” with historical origins that continue to affect the circumstances children grow up in, how they’re treated...

California Legislative Update – Fall 2019

Five of the bills that the California Campaign to Counter Childhood Adversity (4CA) was tracking this legislative session were signed or incorporated into law! They are: Assembly Bill 741 (Kalra), which requires the Department of Health Care Services to provide trainings for personnel who administer trauma screenings in a pediatric or primary care providing setting for children in Medi-Cal. The substance of this bill was included in the Governor’s May Revise budget, and funded at $50 million...

Bills that address childhood adversity 2019 - updated Oct 2019

California legislative update – Fall 2019 (updated Oct, 2019) Below are the list five bills that were signed or incorporated into law that the California Campaign to Counter Childhood Adversity (4CA) was tracking. Below that is the table of bills 4CA was tracking that address childhood adversity in the Legislature for 2019. The list is not an exhaustive list so please email Kelly Hardy with Children Now if you think a bill is missing and/or if you have any questions. Email:...

A Win for California's Families (CA FRC Assoc)

On October 2 nd , Family Resource Centers and the family strengthening field as a whole reached a critical victory, when Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill 436 into law. SB436 built on the findings of the 2017 monograph Family Resource Centers: Vehicles for Change, Volume II, the Evolving Field, as well as a recent study commissioned by the David & Lucille Packard Foundation, to establish in statute an inclusive and clear definition for Family Resource Centers. SB436 represents...

New Laws Add Mental Health Protections For CA Firefighters (The Patch)

By Nick Garber, Patch Staff, October 1, 2019 Three bills signed Tuesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom set up new programs, including peer support groups, for firefighters and first responders. SACRAMENTO, CA — Firefighters and first responders will gain access to mental health support programs and become eligible for workers' compensation based on post-traumatic stress, under three bills signed into law Tuesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. "The job of firefighters and first responders can be very rewarding,...

Study: California Could Lose Millions As Immigrants Begin Disenrolling From Healthcare Programs (KPBS)

By Max Rivlin-Nadler, for KPBS, September 26, 2019 California could lose more than $500 million in federal funding if the Trump administration’s “public charge” rule goes into effect next month (Oct 15th). The “public charge” rule is meant to discourage immigrants from accessing social services. According to a study released last week by researchers at UCLA and the California Immigrant Policy Center, California could lose millions in federal funding that would have gone to hospitals, labs...

Senator Melissa Hurtado’s bill heads to Governor’s desk [The Sentinel]

Staff reports, Sept 5, 2019 for The Sentinel " Under SB 436 , California would place into statute “family resources centers,” while formally recognizing their involvement in programmatic activities already underway within the Office of Child Abuse Prevention ." Senator Melissa Hurtado’s bill heads to Governor’s desk SACRAMENTO — Senator Melissa Hurtado’s (D-Sanger) legislation, Senate Bill 436, which would help prevent child abuse and neglect, is headed to Governor Gavin Newsom’s desk. The...

Implicit bias legislation (calmatters.org)

Well-intentioned individuals have undetected biases that impact their perceptions and decisions, producing discriminatory behavior and unequal treatment of people based on race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, age and other characteristics. If we subconsciously believe that certain lives are less valuable than others, then we may be less likely to try to save those lives. If we latently believe that certain people are more threatening, then we may be less willing...

Gavin Newsom’s health care budget has more help for Covered California, less for undocumented (sacbee.com)

The revised state budget Gov. Gavin Newsom released this week includes more subsidies for Covered California enrollees but doesn’t expand Medi-Cal to all undocumented adults as some lawmakers have pressed him to do. His proposed expansion also extends assistance to people earning up to $73,000 a year, or 600 percent of the federal poverty level, who don’t currently get federal subsidies. California would be the first state to make this change, though Minnesota had a temporary program to help...

Mental Health First-Aid Training Could Have Saved My Daughter’s Life (calhealthreport.org)

The morning of Alliy’s suicide was as normal as any other. The kids were getting ready for school and nothing seemed amiss other than Alliy being overly dressed for a warm day. Before leaving she kissed her siblings and told each one that she loved them. Alliy then told me she loved me and said goodbye as she walked out the door. That was the last time I would ever see my daughter. We were not allowed to watch the video footage from the Golden Gate Bridge that morning confirming Alliy had...

Could Expanding Nurse’s Scope of Care Help Fight the Opioid Epidemic in California? (kqed.org)

When it comes to treating opioid addiction, most health care experts say nurses have a critical role to play in prescribing the lifesaving medication buprenorphine. Buprenorphine can be prescribed by both doctors and nurses who have taken specific training and received a license from the Drug Enforcement Administration. A study published in the medical journal JAMA in April found that states without a physician-oversight requirement to prescribe buprenorphine have more nurses getting...

Universal preschool bills advance, and it’s more than just baby steps (calmatters.org)

Legislation that would significantly expand California’s subsidized preschool program cleared its first committee hearing Wednesday, leaving early childhood education advocates increasingly optimistic that at least the first phase of their long-sought effort will cross the finish line this year. For years, pressure has mounted at the Capitol to increase access to preschool for the state’s youngest pupils. Advocates say expanding early childhood services would have a powerful ripple effect in...

New bill would require California colleges to let homeless students park overnight (mercurynews.com)

According to several recent surveys, around one in five — or about 400,000 — California community college students has experienced homelessness in the last year. Thousands more are at risk of becoming homeless. Calling that number “shocking, alarming and tragic,” Assemblyman Marc Berman, D-Palo Alto, on Tuesday outlined a new bill — AB 302 — that would force community colleges to allow homeless students to sleep inside their vehicles in campus parking lots overnight. “Shame on us if we turn...

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