Tagged With "God"

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Building Resilience for Better Lives - from HelenaIR.com

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Life is hard. “In this world you WILL have trouble,” Jesus said. The ability to successfully face the hardships that will inevitably come to us will determine our level of satisfaction, joy, and peace. Resilience isn’t just a desirable trait, it’s absolutely essential. And, it turns out that scripture has a lot to say about this essential quality for successful living. There are many passages we could examine to illustrate the point, but the letter from James is one of my favorites. Eugene...
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Chaplain Chris Haughee Interview

Teri Wellbrock ·
To quote a friend who just gave her testimony at our church about her own struggles with mental health misdiagnosis and recovery, she was told after her first hospitalization, “This won’t be the first time you deal with this.” Our trauma is always with us.
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Coming back to ‘The Wall': building resilience by learning to trust

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Recently, we did an object lesson as part of our Resilience-based series that I call “the Wall.” We talked about how bad things happen in this world despite having a loving God that looks over us. We make bad choices at times that hurt us, and others make bad choices that hurt us. In general, there is a lot of brokenness in relationships that causes a lot of damage. So, I told the children, we learn how to protect ourselves. Just like castles have BIG walls or our cottages on campus have...
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Covenant Pastors Collaborate to address Mental Health, ACEs

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
I couldn't be prouder of my home church, Headwaters Covenant Church in Helena, MT. Throughout the fall, we have been purposefully and carefully addressing subjects that the church often avoids. Among these topics are the family dysfunction that results from generational trauma, the prevalence of adversity in childhood within families in Montana, training in suicide awareness and prevention, and moral injury (especially among our veterans and service men and women). Just this last Sunday we...
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Drawing connections, building empathy and resilience in traumatized children

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
At Intermountain's residential services, we have spent a lot of time this past month focusing on thankfulness, gratitude, and recognizing how richly we have been blessed. This has allowed me, as their chaplain, to encourage empathetic responses to the needs of others while also building a positive self-image as each child recognizes that they have something to give others. Woven into this narrative was a recognition of our interdependence and that it is not a sign of weakness to acknowledge...
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Finding healing after trauma: Elizabeth Smart (courtesy of Goalcast)

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
One of the most common questions I get from the trauma-affected children I serve is, "Why did God allow [insert really awful, tragic experience] to happen to me?" I imagine it's a question that most pastors, ministers, chaplains, and those Christians who share their faith with others face. It's fundamentally a relational question, not a theological one... and that's important to remember. The question is seeking the reason why a God who is Love could allow something that is experienced as...
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Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
First thing you may ask is What?? and then, perhaps, Why?? Well... The story of Jesus’ arrest, trial, death, burial and resurrection can be difficult for many people, but none more so than the victims of abuse or neglect, or for anyone especially affected by violence. We want to be sensitive to the special needs of those that have endured trauma, but still remain truthful to the gospel. So, what is a parent, children’s minister, or pastor to do around Easter? It’s a tough situation. If you...
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Know Your ACE PLACE

Donna Chacko, M.D. ·
What did you think about when you first learned about ACEs? If you have completed the 10-question ACE survey, you will know your score and might have some idea as to the score of your parents or your children. What is your perspective? Where do you stand? By placing yourself in one or more of the following categories, which I will call ACE PLACES, you will be taking the first step toward the healing and prevention of ACEs.
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Knowing and Growing - a look in to a recent chapel lesson from my Resilience series

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Dear friends at ACEsConnection, I thought it might be of interest to you to see an example of how I am integrating the themes of resilience building, and in particular the measures from the Children and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM-12+4), into our chapel times on campus at Intermountain Residential Services in Helena, Montana. What appears below is part of the lesson built around the tried and true measure of resilience: can the child identify skills and abilities that are making them more...
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Something to Consider... for the next time you teach or preach on worry

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
As I start to talk with pastors about why ACEs matter and why they should inform themselves and their congregations, I regularly hear something like this: "But why does it matter? What difference should it make in ministry? Can't I simply preach and teach the Bible and leave the results up to God?" By way of answer to these questions, I am starting to put together a training called "10 things that kid with ACEs would like you to know: moving your church toward greater empathy." The following...
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Was Jesus' ministry "trauma-informed?" [part 1]

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
I have written before about a growing trend in education, mental health, social services, and health care that has now extended to ministry settings: becoming trauma-informed . Trauma results when we experience something as physically or emotionally harmful or life threatening. A traumatic event, circumstance or series of events leaves a lasting effect on our ability to experience “life to the full” as Jesus intended (John 10:10). Adversity, and particularly traumatic stress in childhood,...
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Was Jesus’ ministry “trauma-informed?” [part 4]: Responding to trauma within the compassionate Kingdom of God

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
There is a movement taking shape across the country when it comes to ministry settings: becoming trauma-informed . I am personally invested in this movement and I am intrigued by the ways I see connections between Jesus’ teachings and trauma-informed ministry principles. In the first post in the series, I focused only the first identifier of a trauma-informed ministry: the realization of the widespread impact of trauma and potential paths for recovery. In the second and third posts, I...
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Re: Something to Consider... for the next time you teach or preach on worry

Linda Ranson Jacobs ·
Great analogies. You put it so bluntly. Maybe that's been the missing element in talking to pastors and church leaders about how to minister to those in trauma or those adults have a high ACEs score. Keep these thoughts coming. Much appreciated
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Re: Something to Consider... for the next time you teach or preach on worry

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Thanks, Linda. Blunt? Ha ha... Here at Intermountain we teach the children to "be direct" and we try and do the same. "Tell me what you need so I can do my best to help you," "Use your words..." etc. etc. So, while I was always a pretty direct person who didn't shy away from confrontation in ministry, I have shed almost all inhibition when it comes to addressing issues head on! Also, Linda, you know better than I do from your time in ministry, these issues don't go away with niceties. This...
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Re: Something to Consider... for the next time you teach or preach on worry

Sandy Goodwick ·
Perhaps it's time for the faith-based community to step back awhile and *listen to* those who sit in their pews (and those who leave). Start by asking those with lived experiences' of emotional distress to share their stories of the memories and events that served as the kindling for later depression, substance abuse and PTSD. Just... LISTEN. Take notes because the ten items on that ACEs list do not comprise the totality of adversities that children experience. Children may be bullied...
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Re: Something to Consider... for the next time you teach or preach on worry

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Excellent points, Sandy... just another affirmation of how valuable this online community can be, as your words challenge and fuel me and encourage me at the same time! Vulnerability, TRUE vulnerability, is very hard in spiritual leadership... I have had church members get visibly agitated my times I have dipped my toe in these waters (years ago... pre-ACE Study), because their image (read: idol) of a minister was someone that was a spiritual superhero that didn't bleed... especially not...
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Re: Was Jesus' ministry "trauma-informed?" [part 1]

Linda Ranson Jacobs ·
Chaplain, I love this take. I'm going to be waiting anxiously for the next installment. I've often used Isaiah 61:1 in workshops but now I'm going to incorporate it into my trauma-informed churches workshop. Jesus understood and he had empathy one of the most important traits in dealing with kids in trauma. Thanks so much. Linda
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Re: Was Jesus' ministry "trauma-informed?" [part 1]

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Thank you, Linda! Honored that you'd be looking forward to the next installment!
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Jaime J. Romo, Ed.D. ·
Hi, Chris, One thing jumps out at me about this poem. Black is for shame; white is for grace. I believe that the author and you mean good and no harm, and the association between black and bad/ white and good is so historical and pervasive that I would not use this version of the poem/ story. Racism is pervasive, often unrecognized, and traumatic. Peace, Jaime
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
Jaime, great point. Not sure how to mitigate that... The spiritual teaching point would need to be differentiated from any conclusions that could be drawn by the hearers in regards to racial judgment. I probably do this by habit, now, having worked in a multicultural setting for years, but this would not be intuitive for others, and for them your reminder is helpful! Chris
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Annie Kitching ·
What a great revision! I needed it just a week earlier to revise the "Jelly Bean Catechism" bags we made this year. Next year, we're on it. The whole "black" and "white" thing is so difficult, because this imagery is everywhere - in art, literature, and Scripture. Thinking about it, it occurs to me that the problem is with labeling PEOPLE "black" or "white". It has always seemed ridiculous to me since no skin color is either black or white.
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Chaplain Chris Haughee ·
So... given the black jelly bean white jelly bean discussion, I thought Jane's recent post on here was interesting: https://www.acesconnection.com/...hite-prince-ea-5-min
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Jaime J. Romo, Ed.D. ·
I like the video. I think it's all true and I hope we don't get into a simple either-or way of looking at race and all the history and current conscious and unconscious dynamics that surround it. Yes, labels limit- we are much more than those. And labels privilege others. I see both- and, and simply as adding some thoughtful context around the jellybean poem (and there are other similar apparently innocuous stories, movies, images) could make it richer and even more meaningful. Peace.
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Re: Free Resource! A "Trauma Informed" Jelly Bean Easter Poem

Sandy Goodwick ·
How would the Black community react to the sentences that start with Black, and White?
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Re: Drawing connections, building empathy and resilience in traumatized children

Ron Huxley ·
Thanks for sharing these ideas to create a space for God in trauma-informed care. I am also working on creative thoughts and ideals for faith-based TIC.
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Re: Building Resilience for Better Lives - from HelenaIR.com

Casey G. Gwinn ·
Chris, Great post. Thank you for the work you are doing. I would encourage you to include hope. There is so much in the Bible on the centrality of hope in people's lives. Hope is even more measurable and teachable than resilience. But thank you for connecting resilience to spirituality. It so crucial to so many that overcome trauma, violence, and adversity. My wife works at Mt. Miguel Covenant Village in San Diego and we attend a small Covenant Church. Mt. Miguel residents are huge...
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