Helping Someone with PTSD: Helping a Loved One While Taking Care of Yourself (www.helpguide.org/)

 

"PTSD can take a heavy toll on relationships. It can be hard to understand your loved one’s behavior—why they are less affectionate and more volatile. You may feel like you’re walking on eggshells or living with a stranger. You may have to take on a bigger share of household tasks, deal with the frustration of a loved one who won’t open up, or even deal with anger or disturbing behavior. The symptoms of PTSD can also lead to job loss, substance abuse, and other problems that affect the whole family."

"Be patient. Recovery is a process that takes time and often involves setbacks. The important thing is to stay positive and maintain support for your loved one."

"Trauma alters the way a person sees the world, making it seem like a perpetually dangerous and frightening place. It also damages people’s ability to trust others and themselves. If there’s any way you can rebuild your loved one’s sense of security, it will contribute to their recovery."

"Express your commitment to the relationship. Let your loved one know that you’re here for the long haul so they feel loved and supported."

"Set boundaries. Be realistic about what you’re capable of giving. Know your limits, communicate them to your family member and others involved, and stick to them."

To read Melinda Smith and Lawrence Robinson's full article, click: https://www.helpguide.org/arti...meone-with-ptsd.htm/

Add Comment

Comments (0)

×
×
×
×