Tagged With "Child"

Blog Post

Focusing on "Creating Nurturing Systems"

Jenny Cooper ·
In just six weeks, stakeholders from across North Carolina will get together to learn about system integration work with youth involved with child welfare. This is the third annual Benchmarks' Partnering for Excellence (PFE) Conference and this year, we have decided to really focus on "Creating Nurturing Systems". While the daily work of PFE can be hard and challenges us to think of new ways to meet the needs of the family, the annual conference offers us a way to celebrate our successes and...
Blog Post

Mapping the Link Between Life Expectancy and Educational Opportunity [childtrends.org]

By Renee Ryberg, Nadia Orfali Hall, Claire Kelley, Jessica Warren, and Kristen Harper, Child Trends, January 2020 In 2015, an average 15-year-old could expect to live to age 79. However, teens living in the 1 percent of neighborhoods with the lowest life expectancies could expect to live to 70—a lifespan nine years shorter. Educational attainment, a key social determinant of health, is one of the most powerful predictors of life expectancy. This association has strengthened over the past 20...
Blog Post

Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens [developingchild.harvard.edu]

By Jack P. Shonkoff and David R. Williams, Center on the Developing Child, April 27, 2020 The COVID-19 virus is ruthlessly contagious and, at the same time, highly selective. Its capacity to infect is universal, but the consequences of becoming infected are not. While there are exceptions, children are less likely to show symptoms, older adults and those with pre-existing medical conditions are the most susceptible, and communities of color in the United States are experiencing dramatically...
Blog Post

Addressing Breastfeeding, Coronavirus, and the Crisis of Child Abuse with one of the Nation's Top Pediatricians [wjbf.com]

By Marlena Wilson, WJBF, March 9, 2020 Sally Goza. From Adverse Childhood Experiences to protecting your child’s mental health. And, of course, you cannot turn on the television or the radio or pick up a newspaper without hearing about the coronavirus. Dr. Goza talks about it, how it impacts children, and what you need to know going forward to make sure that you keep your family in the best health possible. Brad Means: She is Dr. Sara Goza. Her friends, because she’s from the state of...
Blog Post

Connections Matter Training: Preventing and Mitigating ACEs

Julia Neighbors ·
Every day connections are more important than we ever believed . Science tells us that relationships have the power to shape our brains. Relationships help us learn better, work better, parent better. When we experience tough times or traumatic experiences, they help us heal . With each connection, we develop a healthier stronger community. Connections Matter Georgia is an in-person training designed to engage community members in building caring connections to: • Improve resiliency, •...
Comment

Re: Mapping the Link Between Life Expectancy and Educational Opportunity [childtrends.org]

Michael Harrell ·
This is an interesting survey and study. They found a perhaps 6% addition to life if you have a robust quality education.. This is well worth noting. From what I can tell the only hard data we have of the results of emotional issues is the actual use of drugs for pain depression and psychological issues including binge drinking. These people are not happy campers. The 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) collects information on the reasons people misuse prescription...
Comment

Re: Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens [developingchild.harvard.edu]

Deborah Chosewood ·
Thank you for sharing. We were just having this conversation this week in relation to our 2020 Georgia Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan. Great article!
Comment

Re: Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens [developingchild.harvard.edu]

Michael Harrell ·
This is a sloppy article by some under informed Harvard big shots. First this is not ruthlessly contagious we all carry the corona virus as a waste product of our cells just like we all have cancer cells. There is no scientific evidence that the flu is contagious at all. Then the test they give have a 80% failure rate for detecting this cell shedding toxin we are calling the flu. This is not a pandemic any more than a regular flu we get each year. The death rate is to date .034%. That is 34...
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