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Brannon: Tulane psychiatrist wins national award for research that shows how trauma seeps across generations

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) has selected Tulane child psychiatry professor Dr. Stacy Drury to receive the 2018 Norbert and Charlotte Rieger Award for Outstanding Scientific Achievement. The award recognizes the most significant paper published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry by a child and adolescent psychiatrist within the last year. It’s a record fourth time a Tulane child psychiatrist has won the prestigious...

Child Mind Institute: Not All Attention Problems Are ADHD

Trouble paying attention is often first identified by a teacher who notices that a student seems more easily distracted than most other kids his age. Maybe the child takes an unusually long time to finish schoolwork in class. Maybe when the teacher calls on him, he doesn’t seem to have been following the lesson. Maybe he seems to tune out when instructions are given, or forget what he’s supposed to be doing. Maybe homework assignments often go missing. While all children, especially those...

Annabelle Timset: We’ve been ignoring the problem of dads and depression for decades—at a huge cost to kids

Just as dads who take an active role in their children’s lives can help kids reach their full potential, less engaged dads can harm their kids’ development. In some cases, the underlying cause of that lack of engagement may be undiagnosed depression. Depressed dads are more likely to spank their kids . They’re also less likely to read to them, which may hamper their child’s cognitive development and literacy skills. And prior studies have shown that the children of depressed fathers have an...

Rebecca Pearson: Mental health: depression and anxiety in young mothers is up by 50% in a generation

Back when it first started, 17% of young pregnant women in the Children of the 90s study reported symptoms severe enough to indicate clinical levels of depression. This figure was already worryingly high in the 1990s, but in their daughters’ generation it is even more common: 25% of the second generation of the study – women under the age of 24 who are becoming pregnant now – are reporting signs of depression and anxiety. Children of the 90s started following the mental and physical health...

Anya Kamenetz: How The Science Of Learning Is Catching Up To Mr. Rogers

Editor's note on Aug. 8, 2018: This piece has been substantially updated from a version published in 2014. A solemn little boy with a bowl haircut is telling Mr. Rogers that his pet got hit by a car. More precisely, he's confiding this to Daniel Striped Tiger, the hand puppet that, Rogers' wife, Joanne, says, "pretty much was Fred." "That's scary," says Daniel/Fred. He asks for a hug. The boy hugs the tiger. Not a dry eye in the house. That scene is from Won't You Be My Neighbor , the hit...

Caroline Miller: Back to School Anxiety - How to help kids manage worries and have a successful start to the school

The start of the new school year is exciting for most kids. But it also prompts a spike in anxiety: Even kids who are usually pretty easy-going get butterflies, and kids prone to anxiety get clingier and more nervous than usual. Parents feel the pain, too: Leaving a crying child at preschool isn’t anyone’s idea of fun. And having to talk a panicked first grader onto the bus or out of the car at school can be a real test of your diplomatic skills. Kids who normally have a little trouble...

John Gomperts: The Underrated Healing Power of a Healthy Relationship

F or centuries, religion and science have regularly found themselves at odds in defining the essential truths of our world—a debate that, of course, continues today. So, we should take note when distinguished leaders in those two, often-conflicting domains find themselves arriving at the same conclusion about a fundamental question: how do we put more struggling young people on a path toward success? The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke...

Lisa Speckhard Pasque: Arts Program Gives Kids with Incarcerated Parents a Stigma-Free Place to Create and Learn

Damien Smith Jr. wasn’t always embarrassed that his father is in prison. Just this winter, when playing with a giant checker set at the Monona Public Library, he readily told a little girl that he played the game with his dad in prison and beat him all the time. But Damien's grandmother, Pat Dillon, saw the look on the little girl’s face. At 6, Damien doesn’t want to talk about his dad’s incarceration anymore. He gets teased or talked about. This summer, he was bullied. “I knew that there...

Public health strategies, ACEs, and much more to learn [ClaremoreProgress.com]

What does a legislator do when not in session? Last month, I was asked by the Speaker to attend a regional meeting of key state policymakers with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It seems the committee chairmen of our health-related committees couldn’t attend, so I was afforded the opportunity to learn about something not exactly in my wheelhouse. The meeting was sponsored by the National Conference of State Legislatures, and is the third such specialized session they’ve...

Rapaport: Parents' Childhood Trauma Tied to Behavior Problems in Kids

Parents who had a lot of traumatic or stressful experiences during childhood may be more likely to have kids with behavioral problems, a U.S. study suggests. Adverse childhood experiences can include witnessing parents fight or go through a divorce, having a parent with a mental illness or substance abuse problem, or suffering from sexual, physical or emotional abuse. These childhood experiences have been linked to "toxic stress," or wear and tear on the body that leads to physical and...

Dorman: Reducing childhood trauma may affect addiction, incarceration rates [JournalRecord.com]

With the upcoming task force formed by Senate Bill 1517, I am confident Oklahoma has taken a major step forward in overcoming the high rate of adverse childhood experiences that affects our residents. For those of you not familiar with ACEs, this is the study of childhood trauma and the associated health-related conditions that follow into adulthood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on...

Early Childhood Is Critical to Health Equity

The first few years of life are crucial in establishing a child’s path toward—or away from—health and well-being across the entire lifespan. A report, produced in partnership with the University of California, San Francisco, examines some of the barriers to health equity that begin early in life, and promising strategies for overcoming them. Key Findings Poverty limits childrens’ and families’ options for healthy living conditions. Poverty can limit where children live, and can lead to...

Creating hope from adverse childhood experiences

There is no doubt that the landmark Adverse Childhood Experiences study by Anda and Felitti has shifted the landscape of how we think about childhood. The ACEs study established the link between early adverse experiences and later negative outcomes. A brief overview of the key areas of early adversity included in the ACEs study are: (1) physical abuse, (2) sexual abuse, (4) physical neglect, (5) emotional neglect, (6) having a parent with a mental illness, (7) having a parent with substance...

Healthy Minds OK Business Roundtable

The Journal Record hosted the paid roundtable “Trauma in Oklahoma – What Has Happened to Us and What Do We Do Now?” The panel featured mental health and childcare experts, who discussed how trauma affects the mental health of Oklahoma residents and how therapy and awareness can lessen its effects. The Healthy Minds OK Business Roundtable partners sponsored the event. The group includes nonprofit organizations committed to improving and impacting individual lives and communities through...

DR. ROBERT BLOCK: A pediatrician’s perspective on ACEs, resilience

As an academic and clinical pediatrician with over 40 years of experience, I was impressed and amazed when I first heard Dr. Vince Felitti speak about his ground-breaking work on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), first published in 1998. For the last several years a multitude of professionals have been working on the clinical (practical) application of his work, and more have been learning about the genetics, brain chemistry, and other scientific explanations for his findings. The core...

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