Reply to "Program or curriculum for using ACEs & trauma research to create systems change"

Hi Nancy and Jane,

I just tried attaching as a pdf again and I am hoping it was successful. If you don't see it, please send me an email at lwang@rippleeffects.com and I will send it to your directly. In addition, I pasted the abstract.

Jane, to clarify: positive discharge from a partial hospitalization program for middle school aged children with mental health diagnoses was cut in half compared to the control group without Ripple Effects.

If this is not what you are looking for, we have other studies that point to our results in schools which include up to 77% increase in prosocial behavior, 67% decrease in discipline referrals, and up to 1.5 pts increase in GPA, increases in attendance etc. https://rippleeffects.com/impacts/#see-the-studies And, there is another program for staff, which is not training to learn how to use our software, because it is fairly intuitive, this is software to support teachers and staff in best practices on managing students.  https://rippleeffects.com/products/professional-development/ 

Here is the abstract: ABSTRACT 
The purpose of this pilot, matched-control study (N=86) was to assess the feasibility of exposing students with mental health diagnoses to a technology-based set of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions tools, in order to decrease treatment days and increase the rate of positive discharges in a school-based, partial hospitalization program, thereby expediting reintegration of these students into the general school population and reducing costs of treatment. The technology-based set of interventions included a bio-feedback monitor of heart rate variability, group level, computer-based training in core social emotional competencies, and private, personalized, learner-directed, motivational counseling and skill training to address underlying reasons for distress. Pairwise comparisons of students in the treatment school with those in each of three control schools demonstrated that the technology-enhanced intervention program resulted in significantly fewer days of treatment for the experimental group (p<.02), and substantially higher rates of successful discharge, which did not reach the level of significance. Client Satisfaction Surveys from program administration and staff at the trial program school all rated the technology enhanced interventions at the highest level of satisfaction, reported a desire to continue use, and provided comments about ways that the technologies increased client engagement, and enhanced therapeutic relationships and efforts in a variety of ways. Student rating of their use of the technology tool was positive. Further research is indicated to: enlarge and replicate this study, separate effects of the two technology tools, investigate outcomes at an individual versus group level, examine outcomes in terms of types of diagnosis and dosage, calculate cost benefits, assess staff, patient and family satisfaction and sustainability of practice. 
 

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