Skip to main content

In the summer months I have the opportunity to work at a summer day camp. Does anyone have experience with effectively bringing ACEs/Resilience to staff in this context? I know for the most part if would look very similar to staff development of any other kind; however, most staff are 16 years old-early 20s and have not necessarily had the extent of education/experiences that we find with the staff hired in the school settings where I work. I also want to be mindful that some of the junior leaders are still children themselves, and the implications of presenting this to them while also expecting them to extrapolate that into their work with the younger children. 

Original Post
Cissy White (ACEs Connection Staff) posted:

Hi Melissa:
I wonder if Paper Tigers would be a good start since it features teens as well as general ACEs/TI concepts and is so easy to access now? That was my first thought to open up a conversation or fairly brief training half day. Cis

That's a great idea! Our training day will be limited with them so I will see if there is a section of the film that would have greater impact. Thank you!

Peter Chiavetta posted:

Her is a link for a power point that you can scale down. https://ticiwny.com/trauma-101       If you go under Resources on this sight there are trailers for most of the ACE films out there.  Also included is a short power point I used for a group of school guidance counselors. 

Thank you for sharing! That will also be a great resource for my work the rest of the year.

You might look at Mind Matters as a way to train your young staff and also provide them with tools to work with  campers to heal their trauma and build resilience. People are using the materials with children down to the 4th grade and up into high school.

Happy to send you a complimentary, online review copy because it's always good to see it for yourself.

(Note: The Dibble Institute is the publisher of Mind Matters.)

Kay Reed posted:

You might look at Mind Matters as a way to train your young staff and also provide them with tools to work with  campers to heal their trauma and build resilience. People are using the materials with children down to the 4th grade and up into high school.

Happy to send you a complimentary, online review copy because it's always good to see it for yourself.

(Note: The Dibble Institute is the publisher of Mind Matters.)

Yes please; it would be wonderful to review! If email is the way to do that, can you send it to mmcpheeters@fpschools.org please? It would be great to be able to speak to the material when I meet with the other decision-makers in the process

Melissa L. McPheeters posted:
Kay Reed posted:

You might look at Mind Matters as a way to train your young staff and also provide them with tools to work with  campers to heal their trauma and build resilience. People are using the materials with children down to the 4th grade and up into high school.

Happy to send you a complimentary, online review copy because it's always good to see it for yourself.

(Note: The Dibble Institute is the publisher of Mind Matters.)

Yes please; it would be wonderful to review! If email is the way to do that, can you send it to mmcpheeters@fpschools.org please? It would be great to be able to speak to the material when I meet with the other decision-makers in the process

On its way! Thanks!

Kay Reed posted:
Melissa L. McPheeters posted:
Kay Reed posted:

You might look at Mind Matters as a way to train your young staff and also provide them with tools to work with  campers to heal their trauma and build resilience. People are using the materials with children down to the 4th grade and up into high school.

Happy to send you a complimentary, online review copy because it's always good to see it for yourself.

(Note: The Dibble Institute is the publisher of Mind Matters.)

Yes please; it would be wonderful to review! If email is the way to do that, can you send it to mmcpheeters@fpschools.org please? It would be great to be able to speak to the material when I meet with the other decision-makers in the process

On its way! Thanks!

Hi Kay, I am in Southern Oregon and putting together a proposal for a number of offerings re trauma-aware programs for youth and for families. It looks like, Mind Matters could be a good fit for this section of our community.

Would it be possible for me to also review an online version of your materials?

If so, thank you very much. 

Dean Walker
www.LivingResilience.net
Medford, OR
541-499-2768

Dean Walker posted:
Kay Reed posted:
Melissa L. McPheeters posted:
Kay Reed posted:

You might look at Mind Matters as a way to train your young staff and also provide them with tools to work with  campers to heal their trauma and build resilience. People are using the materials with children down to the 4th grade and up into high school.

Happy to send you a complimentary, online review copy because it's always good to see it for yourself.

(Note: The Dibble Institute is the publisher of Mind Matters.)

Yes please; it would be wonderful to review! If email is the way to do that, can you send it to mmcpheeters@fpschools.org please? It would be great to be able to speak to the material when I meet with the other decision-makers in the process

On its way! Thanks!

Hi Kay, I am in Southern Oregon and putting together a proposal for a number of offerings re trauma-aware programs for youth and for families. It looks like, Mind Matters could be a good fit for this section of our community.

Would it be possible for me to also review an online version of your materials?

If so, thank you very much. 

Dean Walker
www.LivingResilience.net
Medford, OR
541-499-2768

Hi Dean, Let's connect! There is strong interest in establishing an ACEs community in the Southern part of OR. Recently coastal folks started South Coast Together In the NW part of the state Washington County OR ACEs Connection community is active. HERE is a blog describing some of the work of Trauma Informed Oregon. Additionally, there emerging activity around Salem called "Mid-Valley ACEs Connection" - see description below. This group is in development and will be made public soon!  My contact info: cell/text 707-228-8560 and /or kclemmer@acesconnection.com Looking forward to connecting soon! Karen

Creating a shared space for the community of Marion and Polk Counties, and nearby areas, will help those in need to take advantage of the great work being done to support one another to thrive--not just survive.
Last edited by Karen Clemmer (ACEs Connection Staff)

I do trainings with YMCA summer camp and after school staff quite regularly. I usually take my Trauma Basics curriculum and reduce the trauma content, almost nothing on ACEs (depending on the population that they are serving). I focus on brain science (whether its trauma or stress, we all flip our lid) and then about chronic toxic stress. But the majority of the time I talk about building resilience, which is good for kids away from their families in a new environment as well as the global good that resilience heals trauma. It is almost the opposite of trainings that I do for first responders, which focuses a lot on science and neurobiology (what is going on in their head when you encounter someone in the community) and less on what to do with them. 

Your insight that a lot of people in your audience might be very close to their own lived experience of trauma is good thinking. Also, maturity plays a large part in how to frame the information. I remember training about 6 months ago with YMCA after school staff. I always include the "what happened to you" question as a key component of TI care. One of the program managers pulled me aside later and said, "I don't really want these 18-22yo staff, who are working in areas of high trauma/poverty/crime, to ask the kids who they are serving, "what happened. Because they aren't going to know what to do with the answer." 

Have fun, and good luck!

John Richardson-Lauve posted:

I do trainings with YMCA summer camp and after school staff quite regularly. I usually take my Trauma Basics curriculum and reduce the trauma content, almost nothing on ACEs (depending on the population that they are serving). I focus on brain science (whether its trauma or stress, we all flip our lid) and then about chronic toxic stress. But the majority of the time I talk about building resilience, which is good for kids away from their families in a new environment as well as the global good that resilience heals trauma. It is almost the opposite of trainings that I do for first responders, which focuses a lot on science and neurobiology (what is going on in their head when you encounter someone in the community) and less on what to do with them. 

Your insight that a lot of people in your audience might be very close to their own lived experience of trauma is good thinking. Also, maturity plays a large part in how to frame the information. I remember training about 6 months ago with YMCA after school staff. I always include the "what happened to you" question as a key component of TI care. One of the program managers pulled me aside later and said, "I don't really want these 18-22yo staff, who are working in areas of high trauma/poverty/crime, to ask the kids who they are serving, "what happened. Because they aren't going to know what to do with the answer." 

Have fun, and good luck!

Thank you for this info! We used the 'flipping your lid' analogy in our Parent Nights and I could totally pull that over for this staff training. I am thinking that modifying that presentation and focusing on the topics you suggested is a great direction to go with it. I appreciate the ideas!

Add Reply

Post
ÂĐ 2020 ACEsConnection.com. All rights reserved.
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×