Community Trauma -- assessment tools and intervention models?

Hi all,

I am helping to develop a course in our MSW program on Community Trauma.  We are looking for any tools that help to assess for community traumas and/or intervention/prevention models that would be accessible to our students.  All roads so far lead back to Adverse Community Experiences and Pinderhughes work.  Just curious what else might be out there.  Any and all feedback is greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks!

Original Post

 The World Health Organization's "WHO ACE International Questionnaire" has more questions than the CDC/Kaiser-P... 8/10 question ACE Screening Tool. A guidebook is also available, along with questionnaires-in over 100 languages.   

    An Epidemiologist I heard speak at [then Dartmouth, now] Geisel Medical School, in 2000, noted: "52% of Detroit Metropolitan Area Schoolchildren met the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD". More recently, similar numbers have been reported in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Atlanta.

I'm not certain what the "Disaster and/or Mass-Casualty Emergency Planners" might be using, but here in New Hampshire we now have: "Monadnock Thrives", which has its own website.

A [former] 'New Hampshirite' is now working in the Albany/Troy NY Capitol Region with SUNY [edu.] -Albany. I believe they worked with Troy Housing Authority on the PE/ACE project-for tenants of all ages.

The [nationwide] SPSCOT (State Personnel Systems Coalition on Trauma) may have some helpful info too--they recently "reorganized" and have updated their website/networking, but membership is still by "invitation", and I'd be happy to avail you an 'invite' if that would help.

Hi, Jennifer:
Please find our Resources Center's comprehensive list for your perusal on Trauma-Informed Guides, Presentations, and Self-Assessment Tools.
https://www.acesconnection.com/...ma-informed-practice

Please also find ACEs Science in Communities list from our Resources Center.
https://www.acesconnection.com/...ence-for-communities

Another consideration is our ACEs Science Surveys and Expanded Surveys.
https://www.acesconnection.com/...xtended-aces-surveys

An exciting development, Jennifer! Please consider sharing more as your course comes to fruition.

For MSW students, look at the Recovery to Practice Curriculum funded by SAMHSA. https://www.samhsa.gov/recovery-to-practice. though this talks more about mental health recovery, it's about the same thing as trauma management.

Also, for general community impact, look at the Mind UK's Community Resilience Report. They say to help organizations develop "Wellbeing Impact Assessments." https://www.mind.org.uk/media/...ient_communities.pdf

The standard US approach or "Resilience Cookbook" approach  is to preach about trauma, form committees, try to pass laws, and to give people one on one training on handling trauma. The UK approach is to help organizations build capacity to actually impact wellbeing. Much better in my opinion. 

Al Henning posted:

For MSW students, look at the Recovery to Practice Curriculum funded by SAMHSA. https://www.samhsa.gov/recovery-to-practice. though this talks more about mental health recovery, it's about the same thing as trauma management.

Also, for general community impact, look at the Mind UK's Community Resilience Report. They say to help organizations develop "Wellbeing Impact Assessments." https://www.mind.org.uk/media/...ient_communities.pdf

The standard US approach or "Resilience Cookbook" approach  is to preach about trauma, form committees, try to pass laws, and to give people one on one training on handling trauma. The UK approach is to help organizations build capacity to actually impact wellbeing. Much better in my opinion. 

Your observation about US approach is one I too have noted and have been frustrated with the "cookbook".  I too believe a systemic approach to implementing change is most beneficial.  For one thing, in order for meaningful change to occur, you need a critical mass of knowledgeable people who believe, speak and understand the solutions and the language and ideas that go with them.  To use the "early adopter" model of training may be "organic", but it is not effective.  May have worked for some things that are non-critical, but definitely does not work for well-being issues.  I agree with you building capacity and rolling out training to everyone as you describe is the most practical and effective.  Thanks for your post.

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Arazais OliverosRobert OlcottKaren Clemmer (ACEs Connection Staff)
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