Door County, Wisconsin is hosting a TIC Conference in August 2019. We are seeking a presenter to do a 75-minute breakout session providing a general  overview on Historical/Inter-Generational Trauma - in hopes that we could follow-up with more in-depth education at a future training.  Any suggestions?  Thanks! 

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Cori McFarlane posted:

Door County, Wisconsin is hosting a TIC Conference in August 2019. We are seeking a presenter to do a 75-minute breakout session providing a general  overview on Historical/Inter-Generational Trauma - in hopes that we could follow-up with more in-depth education at a future training.  Any suggestions?  Thanks! 

I have written a book on the link between childhood trauma and adult perpetration of family violence. I based the book on the ACES study which shows that violence is a subset of "poor adult outcomes."

My book is titled "Lifetraps: from Child victim to adult victimization." It is based on my 28 years of working as a prison psychologist in the Wisconsin Department of Corrections. 

I would like the chance to present the neurological, psychological and social effects of trauma on the child and how it leads to adult domestically violent offendering.  I know that my topic is not as pleasant as some but I believe is important to show how violence transfers between generations.

Please contact me. If you find another presenter, please allow me to sell my book at the conference. You can look up more information on Amazon for a more complete summary and reviews. 

My address is pnauth@charter.net

Thank you. Linda Nauth

 

 

Did you know that dissociation, a defensive response to childhood trauma can be  a major mechanism for transmission of violence from one generation to the next? a research study on women who had been abused as children found that women who abused their own children had significantly higher dissociation scores than women who did not abuse their children despite being abused themselves. 

I argue that offenders of violence are often adult survivors of childhood trauma who cope with emotional distress by externalizing, being angry and using aggression. these individuals survived their abusive, neglectful and dysfunctional childhoods by detaching from others and dismissing their feelings thereby trying to suppress an inborn need and drive for attachment.

I hope that others will see the importance of looking at the batterers as adult survivors of childhood trauma. Not as a justification or excuse for the violence but for understanding and intervention. 

I would appreciate any replies.  Linda Nauth.

 

 

 

 

 

ACEs are any experience during childhood (0-18) that causes toxic stress. That includes racism (see Philadelphia Urban ACE Study, among others). It also includes bullying, spanking, living in an unsafe neighborhood, involvement with the foster care system, living in a war zone, emigrating to a different country, losing a family member to deportation, etc.

Here's a good resource to explore:
https://www.acesconnection.com...xtended-aces-surveys

Look at the Expanded ACEs section.

the trauma research indicates that family violence, that by the
child's original caretakers is much more destructive than any of the
others. All of the ACEs in the original study were centered on the
child's ability to attach to a responsive adult. For example, watching
a father beat up the mother interferes with the mother being able to
effectively provide the needed care taking. She is centered on the
husband and deterring his violence to provide for the child.
Working with domestically violent men in prison, the men were all
races and all classes. The key was their family violence. these men
had experienced 4 or more ACES some 8 or 10. I am not denying that the
other experiences are traumatic but saying that the violence of
offenders is more often due to their family violence as children. If
you wanted to identify how the violence is transmitted from one
generation to another, I don't understand why you wouldn't look at the
psychological effects (neurological and cognitive) of early childhood
trauma (family) to see the link between being a child victim and
becoming an adult victimizer.
Family violence is what I am interested in stopping and the key is
being a victim of family violence. The men who were traumatized by
racism and/or violent neighborhoods usually also had other ACES in
their family and troubles with intimacy.
I don't understand why others are not more interested in these
psychological effects. I know sometimes others do not want to look at
the offenders as adult survivors of childhood abuse but I think it is
imperative. Racism is another problem.
Linda Nauth

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Alfred WhiteIngrid Cockhren  (ACEs Connection Staff)
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