Holistic Trauma Approach for a Tiny Rural Town

As I generally do, if something pops into my head, I just ask the question.  So I wanted to ask you all for any and all advice or information or suggestions you may have.  

I am probably leaving my pediatric practice to start a new one with a local counseling/substance abuse service - I'm really into the concept of rural integrated care and bringing everyone in the community in as partners.   

We are a small rural community of 3000 with very few resources, but we have people who know how to write community grants etc.  And like most rural communities, we have a significant allostatic load of multigenerational poverty and trauma and the consequences like Suicide, Opioid Overdose Deaths, Alcoholic Liver Disease, Hepatitis C and HIV.   

I was just re-listening to Dr. Frank Putnam's 2013 lecture at the AVA conference ( http://www.avahealth.org/video...tergenerational.html ) and I was wondering if anyone out there could help me figure out the best ways to get Triple P, PCIT, for the Juvenile Justice Kids - Julian Ford's Target and whatever else you can think into our rural community.  I myself am going to be training to do Neurofeedback and maybe even Internal Family Systems in addition to being a general pediatrician. We have the Public Health Department, the Early Child Development Zero to Three, MIHP,  Great Start and others in our corner and on our side to develop programs that don't exist in a rural community like ours.   

I will be going to the Boston Trauma Conference for a second year in a row and many of you know that I know a lot about this stuff.    So I'm not totally new to all the concepts of how to treat trauma effectively. 

I hope this makes sense as I am in-between patients.  

Any advice or connections you could provide would be awesome.

 

Thanks A Bunch and I Thank You all from the bottom of my heart for everything you are doing to bring communities happy childhoods and hope for a bright and better tomorrow.   

Tina 

Original Post

Tina,

i suggerst you start with the family court judge in your area. The State of Michigan has been willing in th past to provide grant support for innovative juvenile justice programs. I’d be happy to email you the names and information of contacts I’ve had.

I think your proposed project is very needed in Michigan, especially rural Michigan.

~ Cathy 

A parenting/breastfeeding class that acknowledges ACEs might be an excellent way to begin to build better knowledge and resiliency.   Communicating with the primary schools to inform them what trauma "looks like" and when to refer kids for help makes sense as well.  Neurofeedback is so useful, cheap, fast...  In such a small community, you can make a big difference!

Watched the video. Thanks for sharing! Building on Dr. Putnum's approach to attachment I think, how can we build community that will wraparound those in need and foster belonging. It is the idea of Attachment to Belonging. The National Wraparound Initiative out of Washington State has all kinds of information based on research. Wraparound has principles that honors the strengths and resources of the individual, family and community knowing that it takes all of us to build resiliency. Also in Washington they have a model for Community Capacity Development a public health approach to solving interrelated problems by improving people's connections, their shared responsibility , skills and efficacy. This was created in response to the ACE Study.

Good Luck!

Tina Marie Hahn, MD posted:

As I generally do, if something pops into my head, I just ask the question.  So I wanted to ask you all for any and all advice or information or suggestions you may have.  

I am probably leaving my pediatric practice to start a new one with a local counseling/substance abuse service - I'm really into the concept of rural integrated care and bringing everyone in the community in as partners.   

We are a small rural community of 3000 with very few resources, but we have people who know how to write community grants etc.  And like most rural communities, we have a significant allostatic load of multigenerational poverty and trauma and the consequences like Suicide, Opioid Overdose Deaths, Alcoholic Liver Disease, Hepatitis C and HIV.   

I was just re-listening to Dr. Frank Putnam's 2013 lecture at the AVA conference ( http://www.avahealth.org/video...tergenerational.html ) and I was wondering if anyone out there could help me figure out the best ways to get Triple P, PCIT, for the Juvenile Justice Kids - Julian Ford's Target and whatever else you can think into our rural community.  I myself am going to be training to do Neurofeedback and maybe even Internal Family Systems in addition to being a general pediatrician. We have the Public Health Department, the Early Child Development Zero to Three, MIHP,  Great Start and others in our corner and on our side to develop programs that don't exist in a rural community like ours.   

I will be going to the Boston Trauma Conference for a second year in a row and many of you know that I know a lot about this stuff.    So I'm not totally new to all the concepts of how to treat trauma effectively. 

I hope this makes sense as I am in-between patients.  

Any advice or connections you could provide would be awesome.

 

Thanks A Bunch and I Thank You all from the bottom of my heart for everything you are doing to bring communities happy childhoods and hope for a bright and better tomorrow.   

Tina 

Tina:

You probably already know, but the Internal Family Systems "headquarters" is in MA near where the Trauma Center Conference is and Sebern Fisher is usually at the Trauma Center as well. I love her book and how she talks and writes about neurofeedback. She's based in MA as well and sometimes training is in the Berkshires. Given the changes at the Trauma Ctr. I'm not sure who is running/leading the Trauma Conference. Cis

Rebecca Wigg-Ninham posted:

Watched the video. Thanks for sharing! Building on Dr. Putnum's approach to attachment I think, how can we build community that will wraparound those in need and foster belonging. It is the idea of Attachment to Belonging. The National Wraparound Initiative out of Washington State has all kinds of information based on research. Wraparound has principles that honors the strengths and resources of the individual, family and community knowing that it takes all of us to build resiliency. Also in Washington they have a model for Community Capacity Development a public health approach to solving interrelated problems by improving people's connections, their shared responsibility , skills and efficacy. This was created in response to the ACE Study.

Good Luck!

Thank You!!!  

I will check all this information out.

Yes, the video is awesome!!!! Dr. Putnam is an absolute hero in his work.  In my humble opinion, it should be watched by those treating patients with High ACE scores - like 10, 15, 20 plus ACEs, multiple times, until the information is deep in one’s soul.    These folks do have a different phenotype.   I see their kids everyday, 18 month olds with 8 ACEs, homelessness, child welfare, parents who cannot read, a family member who just died of suicide or an Opioid overdose.  It’s these families I’m working to reach as they are the most vulnerable to re-victimization and social isolation. 

Relationships heal and I’m trying to figure out, how we can make it safe in our community for parents to feel safe in relationship in order to heal.   

Good Morning Tina,

In considering your ask about parents feeling safe enough in relationship to heal I was reminded of Parent Cafes. I was training through Be Strong Families out of Evanston, Ill. What I really like about it is that it empowers parents. It Promotes Protective Factors in a warm, casual café atmosphere, including snacks and refreshments. There is skill building through peer to peer learning. It is very exciting and brings the community together. Many of us are parents with shared experience.

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Robert OlcottJo CarpenterKaren Clemmer (ACEs Connection Staff)Dr. Cathy Anthofer-Fialon
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