Greetings from Nashville! 

For those who have taken a systems change approach (infusing the ACEs and trauma research into institutional policies & practices), what tools have you used? I'm specifically looking for resources that would help those who work in juvenile justice and correctional systems. 

I'm familiar with the myriad organizational assessments. I'm on the hunt for specific program or curriculum model(s) that help staff at all levels incorporate the ACEs/trauma/brain science research into their respective practice. In other words, I don't need a curriculum to deliver info on ACEs and their impact; rather, I need resources on how these professionals can take the info they've already learned and put it into action to create holistic systems change.

Does such a thing exist? 

So far, I've looked at Working for Kids as well as the Trust Based Relational Intervention. Any other ideas from the ACEsConnection hive? 

Thanks so much! 

- Brad

Original Post

I'm looking forward to hearing replies from others. We have a 3 credit course that addresses practical applications of trauma-informed approaches in organizations. I've reached out to instructors to see what curriculum, if any, they cover in that course.

Deb Berke

Wilmington University

I work at the Mental Health Association of Frederick County in Maryland and 11 months ago, our agency took on the challenge of becoming a "trauma informed agency."  Almost a year in, we are still very much defining what that means for all staff at all levels.  We have completed an organizational assessment to measure job satisfaction versus compassion fatigue (ProQoL) as well as an agency assessment of where we currently are on the TI scale using an assessment from USF.  The agency has adopted a definition for ourselves and the Board of Directors has signed a resolution of being trauma informed.  Throughout the process so far, we used the key principles from SAMHSA as foundational knowledge.  Currently, the volunteer work group supervising this effort is arranging for the entire staff of 65 and all volunteers (100+) to view the documentary, "Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope" followed by a debrief to identify what it is that we expect all staff and volunteers to know about trauma.  Our idea is to identify and create the "New Employee Orientation" piece and then build skills for all levels of staff from there.  It has been a very interesting and at times challenging journey as we all come at it with different backgrounds, experiences, and interpretation of what being trauma informed means at a personal level.  This is compounded by the aspirational goal of supporting clients and families from TI-perspective as well as staff from both a personal and secondary level of TI support. 

As our agency develops itself around this very important topic, we hope to help lead our community in becoming trauma informed.  We are very active in the larger conversation about how our County can become a TI Community across all sectors, institutions, etc.  I am not sure if this posts helps or not but I did feel our struggle and slow progress was worth mentioning.  Best of luck and please share your own progress and findings. Dr. Anda speaks of a trauma informed world and we agree - that is the goal.

 

 

Conscious Discipline is a wonderful program that can help.  I know at first it seems like it's just for schools, but the science behind the practices can be used to adjust to any system. Dr. Bailey has used Conscious Discipline with Native Americans on reservations who deal with generational trauma, incarcerated women to teach the system how to keep attachment with their children and schools all over the nation that are dealing with more and more dysfunction due to trauma. Check this link out...https://youtu.be/RXJGcqcJckA

Wishing you well

We  have been using Positive Discipline in schools and using the same process to build the skills to support restorative circles /class meetings. It is the regular use of circles and group problem solving that has made such a huge impact on families and classrooms. The paradigm shift away from punishments and rewards takes time and practice - and the results are powerful.  On one school visit when visitors asked the 5th graders what was different about their school, a student replied, "Here we give each other grace. We know we make  mistakes and we give each other a second chance."

That is the kind of community in which everyone can learn - and resilience flourishes.

Paying attention and interested in responses as well. We did some work with our probation department in Contra Costa County and confronted this problem as well: after the training (we used the Sanctuary Model) what do day-to-day changes in practice *look* like? 

Thanks for raising the question. I will look st Positive Discipline too. 

Our organization has a curriculum to prevent ACEs by educating teens about parenting before they conceive a child.  We've been conducting the program for over 10 years, and this year we are making our instructional materials - student workbooks and Discussion guides - available to schools and agencies.  Our program Healthy Foundations for Future Families doesn't teach about ACEs specifically, but rather proactively helps teens create life-plans that will avoid ACEs for their future children.  Teens report our program is very impactful in changing their perspective and plans.  One of our most receptive audiences has been juvenile justice teens.  Our organization is Education for Successful Parenting.  I'd be happy to share more information about our program and experiences with anyone who is interested.  Please feel free to email me - rrubenstein@eduparents.org.  

Anyone who is studying systems related to ACE information should have a look at this remarkable, short, well-written and researched book: THINKING IN SYSTEMS: A PRIMER, by Donella Meadows (www.amazon.com/Thinking-System...eadows/dp/1603580557). When one system is replaced or modified, a new system takes over. Understanding the process at an organic level will ensure the success of the new system.

I have created and implemented a curriculum for creating a paradigm shift to trauma informed care using TIP 57 and Restoring Sanctuary by Sandra Bloom and Brian Farragher.  It is a system wide approach that involves didactic training sessions, learning labs and consultation for the implementation of trauma informed care at the organizational level.  I am working with multiple organizations in the St. Louis region.

Brad A. Palmertree posted:

Greetings from Nashville! 

For those who have taken a systems change approach (infusing the ACEs and trauma research into institutional policies & practices), what tools have you used? I'm specifically looking for resources that would help those who work in juvenile justice and correctional systems. 

I'm familiar with the myriad organizational assessments. I'm on the hunt for specific program or curriculum model(s) that help staff at all levels incorporate the ACEs/trauma/brain science research into their respective practice. In other words, I don't need a curriculum to deliver info on ACEs and their impact; rather, I need resources on how these professionals can take the info they've already learned and put it into action to create holistic systems change.

Does such a thing exist? 

So far, I've looked at Working for Kids as well as the Trust Based Relational Intervention. Any other ideas from the ACEsConnection hive? 

Thanks so much! 

- Brad

Hey Brad,

Here at the Johnson City Police Department, I've been partnering with the ETSU Psychology Department to create a system of care in NE TN (we have a group page in Aces Connection) and here's a blog telling about our work.  

https://www.acesconnection.com/...as-a-path-to-healing

We partnered with SAMHSA's National Center for Trauma Informed Care (NCTIC) and been using their course, "SAMHSA's Trauma-Informed Approach: Key Assumptions and Principles" and in 18 months we've trained over 1,400 professionals across a wide sector of disciplines.  This course covers ACE's and brain development but then has two modules on how an agency can implement this understanding into their programming. It's really like a self-inventory you lead them through and they decide as an organization what changes to make. Also it has a module called SAMHSA's 10 Domains which offers practical help for an organization for sustaining a trauma-informed environment for years to come.  If you'd like more information you can email me at bhaas@johnsoncitytn.org 

 

Hello Brad,  I have just published a curriculum that matches your description.  It is a 12 hour curriculum on how to overcome trauma.  Some organizations have used it with there staff and the people they serve.  To get a preview, go to

https://www.dibbleinstitute.org/mind-matters/  I hope this helps.

You can reach me at carolynrichcurtis@gmail.com if you have questions.  Wish you the best.  Carolyn

I'd like to suggest four resources:

1.  Sandra Bloom's Sanctuary Model which has been mentioned by others.

2.  My curriculum Becoming Trauma Informed: A Training for Correctional Professionals.

3.  An online course sponsored by Hazelden Publishing Moving from Trauma Informed to Trauma Responsive.

4.  A video series with S. Bloom and S. Covington Moving from Trauma-Informed to Trauma-Responsive available in March 2018.

Stephanie

sc@stephaniecovington.com

I've worked in the Juvenile Justice system with incarcerated youth in Los Angeles for the past 9 years. Below is a link the offers an overview of the Urban Youth Culture Competency & Engagement Training that I facilitate across the country to youth service professional seeking effectively engage gang and drug impacted, trauma exposed youth.

https://vimeo.com/203036039

Here is my email address: k.rahn@liveabovethehype.com

...and website: www.liveabovethehype.com

Respectfully,

K-Rahn

Schools and agencies across the U.S. have used The Resiliency Workbook: Bounce Back Stronger, Smarter & With Real Self-Esteem as a classroom or group curriculum for traumatized children and youth.  It is based on decades of social science research on how children and youth who experience great adversity (i.e., many ACEs) do bounce back and lead healthy lives.  It has been the #1 best selling book at Amazon.com under "resiliency" for four years.  If you purchase it from my Resiliency In Action website, it comes with a free "Leader's Guide."  You can see more/order here:  

http://www.resiliency.com/prod...resiliency-workbook/

Sincerely,

Nan Henderson, author

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Deb Berke posted:

I'm looking forward to hearing replies from others. We have a 3 credit course that addresses practical applications of trauma-informed approaches in organizations. I've reached out to instructors to see what curriculum, if any, they cover in that course.

Deb Berke

Wilmington University

See my response to Brad.  I work closely with East TN State University and the SAMHSA materials we use to train area professionals - three departments of the university are now incorporating into their curriculum.  

In Sonoma County, we also worked to build ACEs awareness and Trauma Informed language into our County Board of Supervisor's legislative platform and the same with our local health care district's legislative platforms.  

While this is not exactly what you're asking about, it does support building community and political support which will likely benefit your efforts over time.

Elsie Allen Teen Health Center in Sonoma County had support from Johns Hopkins to transform their teen health center to a trauma informed health center.  It was an incredible journey - here are a couple past blogs that provide a bit more detail:  

https://www.acesconnection.com/...-taking-aces-history

https://www.acesconnection.com/...g-notes-from-2-24-16

Hello Brad,

We've had success with the Sanctuary Model, an evidence-supported trauma-responsive organizational change model, in various Juvenile Justice facilities. Please find attached 2 peer-reviewed journal articles - one that highlights the statistically significant improvements on a number of psychological and physical safety items for staff and female youth in a secure JJ facility in PA that implemented our model, as well as a complementary article on the critical role that leadership and employee engagement played in facilitating the change. Would be happy to discuss further offline if you have any questions. Best, Nina

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Hi all, 

I've been involved with YogaHOPE and the TIMBo method in social service agencies and clinical settings as well as general public. It's a Trauma-Informed Mind Body curriculum that is grounded in  research on trauma's effects on the neurobiological system.  It's also trauma-responsive and so the modality is  designed for self management of traumatic stress symptoms in individuals (clients)

 and also designed to foster inter personal and relational empathic communication and resilience among staff in organizations.  The website is https://www.yhtimbo.org. Sue Jones is the founder if you are interested in further discussion.  Best of luck!!

 

Not sure if this is what you are looking for but we have a discussion guide for parent groups to use for reading The Bullying Antidote together. The book frames bullying behavior as being perpetuated through historical ACEs and provides copious positive parenting skills. Teachers love this book as a way to get better partnership from parents. We have been doing a giveaway of this book in Oakland CA and many have been using it successfully in both formal (via schools, foster parent groups, etc.) and informal settings (family reads). (Others are posting their books on Amazon and there are many copies available cheap.) The discussion guide is also available free online. 

Parents find this information invaluable in looking at family systems. There are chapters on family leadership styles, plus information on culture and future shock and changing traditions. 

Hi Brad, 

I direct an initiative in NC called Benchmarks' Partnering for Excellence. Our primary focus is the alignment of mental health and social service systems, and we do that by creating a trauma informed, trauma aware, and trauma responsive community. I am attaching some information for you to check out about the program. Let me know if you have any questions. I love to talk about the changes that we have been able to see.

Best, 

Jenny

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Dear Brad,
 
We have an educational software program, called Ripple Effects (RE) Whole Spectrum Intervention System that is very successful in juvenile justice environments, as well as as a Multi-Tiered intervention in the over 4000 schools using our trauma informed programs. It is the #1 SAMHSA NREPP listed Social Emotional Learning program. The program has excellent fidelity with best practices of over 700 research citations "baked into" the software. Also, because it is technology-based, RE is cost effective on cost-per-user basis.  
 
We just had a study that was conducted by a clinical psychologist in a hospital and residential setting on the Redding, PA and we saw the number of days spent reduced to half, 50% reduction. Positive returns to the general population increased by 30%. We are quite excited by it and are just beginning to get the word out. I've attached the research paper in the event you'd like to delve deeper into it.
 
If you'd like more information about RE, a free trial or a webinar, please let me know and I can have that set up. Here is a link to our website: https://rippleeffects.com/and its use in juvenile justice environments https://rippleeffects.com/?s=juvenile and here is a link to our juvenile justice implementation guide:  https://rippleeffects.com/PDFs/juvenilejustice.pdf.
 
If there are ways that others think we can work together to help this vulnerable population, please reach out. In the meantime, godspeed in the work everyone is doing!
 

Hi Brad,

I work with an organization based in Boston called YogaHOPE. They are bringing a proprietary methodology/curriculum, TIMBo (Trauma-Informed Mind Body) for whole systems well-being to N Street Village, a community empowerment organization for homeless women in Washington D.C. as well as at the WRAP addiction and substance abuse program at Taunton State Hospital.  Briefly, the methodology infuses, operationally, trauma informed and trauma responsive empathic communication into the DNA of organizations at every level. Taunton Staff at all levels are receiving training based on positive outcomes (I don't have final report on hand) of initial piloting. If you would like more information, check out https://www.yhtimbo.org/method.  I can also put you in touch with Sue Jones. 

Best of luck!

Lynn Eikenberry

dleiken@comcast.net

I’m sorry, Lisa, but I don’t see the research paper attached as you referenced. I’m interested in reviewing this for use with a young adult population.

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Hi Nancy and Jane,

I just tried attaching as a pdf again and I am hoping it was successful. If you don't see it, please send me an email at lwang@rippleeffects.com and I will send it to your directly. In addition, I pasted the abstract.

Jane, to clarify: positive discharge from a partial hospitalization program for middle school aged children with mental health diagnoses was cut in half compared to the control group without Ripple Effects.

If this is not what you are looking for, we have other studies that point to our results in schools which include up to 77% increase in prosocial behavior, 67% decrease in discipline referrals, and up to 1.5 pts increase in GPA, increases in attendance etc. https://rippleeffects.com/impacts/#see-the-studies And, there is another program for staff, which is not training to learn how to use our software, because it is fairly intuitive, this is software to support teachers and staff in best practices on managing students.  https://rippleeffects.com/products/professional-development/ 

Here is the abstract: ABSTRACT 
The purpose of this pilot, matched-control study (N=86) was to assess the feasibility of exposing students with mental health diagnoses to a technology-based set of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions tools, in order to decrease treatment days and increase the rate of positive discharges in a school-based, partial hospitalization program, thereby expediting reintegration of these students into the general school population and reducing costs of treatment. The technology-based set of interventions included a bio-feedback monitor of heart rate variability, group level, computer-based training in core social emotional competencies, and private, personalized, learner-directed, motivational counseling and skill training to address underlying reasons for distress. Pairwise comparisons of students in the treatment school with those in each of three control schools demonstrated that the technology-enhanced intervention program resulted in significantly fewer days of treatment for the experimental group (p<.02), and substantially higher rates of successful discharge, which did not reach the level of significance. Client Satisfaction Surveys from program administration and staff at the trial program school all rated the technology enhanced interventions at the highest level of satisfaction, reported a desire to continue use, and provided comments about ways that the technologies increased client engagement, and enhanced therapeutic relationships and efforts in a variety of ways. Student rating of their use of the technology tool was positive. Further research is indicated to: enlarge and replicate this study, separate effects of the two technology tools, investigate outcomes at an individual versus group level, examine outcomes in terms of types of diagnosis and dosage, calculate cost benefits, assess staff, patient and family satisfaction and sustainability of practice. 
 

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Andi FetznerKaren Clemmer (ACEs Connection Staff)Juli HiDeb Berke
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